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Yuschenko says parliament should be dissolved and premier dismissed

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Dec. 23, 2009, 10:53 p.m. | Politics — by Interfax-Ukraine
Simferopol, December 23 (Interfax-Ukraine) - President Viktor Yuschenko has said that the current parliament should be dissolved, which will trigger the dismissal of the incumbent premier. "Such a parliament deserves only one thing - dissolution, because there's no majority there, and there's no responsible prime minister who would lead this majority and make decisions, including the adoption of the budget, and answer how to finance the presidential election," he said in an interview with the Krym state television and radio company in Simferopol on Wednesday.

Yuschenko said that there is no budget resolution for next year in Ukraine for the first time in 18 years. "Nobody in Ukraine knows any macroeconomic figure, and what the [budget] deficit will be," he said, noting that the parliament does not have any draft state budget for 2010 submitted by the prime minister.
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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 1:02 a.m.    

The orange dictator Yshchenko diligently follows the example of his US masters : he needs the best Parliament money can buy, heh, heh, heh :D

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 1:55 a.m.    

He does not understand how democratic nations are supposed to work. He looks for all kinds of excuses and blames others for his own failings. His party "Our Ukraine" had a chance to form a governing coalition after the 2006 election but Yuschenko could agree to form a governing coalition signaling the collapse of the orange revolution and the formation of a alternative government . His dismissal of the parliament back in 2007 was unconstitutional and without merit causing seven months of political and civil unrest to what end?. With a new government elected and his party part of the governing coalition Yushchenko continued to show his inability to work with anyone by ongoing attempts to undermine the governments success.

Yuschenko should have faced the people and renewed his fledgling mandate back in 2007. He dragged out his term of office by opposing an October election (The traditional month for Presidential elections) and forcing Ukraine to hold a January poll. Faced with the prospect of losing the next election he is now trying to cook up an excuse to have that election canceled so his term of office can be extended beyond the five years he was elected to serve.

Five years of division, five years of instability, five years of Yushchenko, Five years wasted setting Ukraine back 10 to 15 years in its economic and democratic development. The problem is not so much the parliament but more to do with the President.

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 2:59 a.m.    

And Yushchenko should be tried in criminal court for corruption and betrayal of Ukrainian people.

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 8:10 a.m.    

He should have been impeached in 2007 for the provisions of breaching Ukraine's Constitution and his oath.to Ukraine. Unfortunately the President has absolute immunity and can not be tried for any criminal or illegal activity

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Anonymous Dec. 25, 2009, 7:15 a.m.    

Specifically for what?

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 7:03 a.m.    

Yushchenko is correct, there is no majority in the RADA, according to Ukrainian law, it must be dissolved, and the PM must go with it, anything else would be undemocratic and illegal.

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 7:56 a.m.    

Yushchenko has no constitutional authority to dismiss the parliament. The only basis for dismissing the parliament is pursuant to article 90 of Ukraine Constitution. As long as the government maintains the confidence of the parliament they have the right to remain in office. Fresh Parliamentary elections may be called in the new year, but again it will have to be in accordance with Ukraine's Constitution. Any attempt by the newly elected head of state to dismiss the parliament without the parliaments consent will be ill advised. If new parliamentary elections are held Our Ukraine would be the biggest loser and Party of Regions could secure a majority in their own right. that combined with the likelihood of Yanukovych being elected President one should be careful and think twice before prematurely advocating such a move.

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 8:05 a.m.    

Article 82

The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine works in sessions.

The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine is competent on the condition that no less than two-thirds of its constitutional composition has been elected.

...

Article 83

Regular sessions of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine commence on the first Tuesday of February and on the first Tuesday of September each year.

...

According to election results and on the basis of a common ground achieved between various political positions, a coalition of parliamentary factions shall be formed in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine to include a majority of People’s Deputies of Ukraine within the constitutional composition of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine.

A coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine shall be formed within a month from the date of the first meeting of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine to be held following regular or special elections to the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, or within a month from the date when activities of a coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine terminated.

...

Article 90

The authority of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine is terminated on the day of the opening of the first meeting of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine of a new convocation.

The President of Ukraine may terminate the authority of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine prior to the expiration of term, if:

(1) there is a failure to form within one month a coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine as provided for in Article 83 of this Constitution;

(2) there is a failure, within sixty days following the resignation of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine, to form the personal composition of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine;

(3) the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine fails, within thirty days of a single regular session, to commence its plenary meetings.

The early termination of powers of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine shall be decided by the President of Ukraine following relevant consultations with the Chairperson and Deputy Chairpersons of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine and with Chairpersons of Verkhovna Rada parliamentary factions.

...

The authority of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine shall not be terminated during the last six months of the term of authority of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine or President of Ukraine.

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 8:07 a.m.    

No where is it stated that the governing coalition is required to maintain a "majority" throughout the term of their office.

Minority governments are common thought the west. As long as the government can maintain the support of the parliament they have the entitlement to remain in office.

Party of Regions can of course resign on mass and force the eventual dismissal of the parliament but this could take up to six months to execute and con only be enacted 30 days following the scheduled date for holding the next regular session of the parliament which commences in February and September of each year.

It is a long way off and Ukraine needs to first address the Presidential election before it considers any other issue. The last thing Ukraine wants is another round of elections.

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 8:19 a.m.    

QUOTE:

"Yushchenko is correct, there is no majority in the RADA, according to Ukrainian law"

Which law. I think you are promoting false and misleading facts. WHY?

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Anonymous Dec. 24, 2009, 8:15 a.m.    

If the parliament is dismissed the prime minister still remains in office until a new convocation takes office. A vote of no confidence in the government would necessitate the resignation of the prime-minister and cabinet and parliament would have to appoint a new government of face the people in a fresh election.

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