KyivPost

Belarus: 3 suspects confess in Minsk subway attack

Print version
April 13, 2011, 10:15 p.m. | Russia and former Soviet Union — by Associated Press

Belarusian police officers hold coffin covers during a funeral ceremony for victims of Monday's subway blast in Minsk, in the village of Kolodishchi, near Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, April 13, 2011.
© AP

MINSK, Belarus (AP) — Three suspects have confessed to being involved in the Minsk subway bombing, police said Wednesday, and Belarusian authorities rounded up dissidents across the country after the president declared that they might know who "ordered the attack." The head of the KGB, Belarus' security service, said a man in his mid-20s was arrested and confessed to carrying out the bombing that killed 12 people and wounded over 200 Monday at the main subway station in Minsk, the capital.

KGB chief Vadim Zaitsev did not identify the man and refused to discuss his motives but said he was "not only unhealthy in his psychological state but unhealthy in his ambitions."

Two other suspects also confessed to being involvement in the subway attack, Zaitsev and police officials said. They did not elaborate.

Authorities have said the bomb was remote-controlled. CCTV footage showed one suspect leaving a bag in the Oktyabrskaya subway station in central Minsk and feeling around for something in his pocket shortly before the explosion, Deputy Prosecutor General Andrei Shved said.

Interior Minister Anatoly Kuleshov said the main suspect also was involved in a bomb blast at a concert in Minsk in July 2008, which wounded about 50 people, and two bombings in September 2005 in the city of Vitebsk that wounded 48 people.

Belarus observed a day of mourning for the victims Wednesday, and several funerals were held.

Several hundred people showed up at the Minsk subway station to observe a minute of silence at 6 p.m., the time of Monday's blast.

Flags flew with black ribbons and residents sobbed as they viewed portraits of the victims at the station.

In a televised appearance earlier Wednesday, President Alexander Lukashenko suggested the blast was the work of dissidents.

He said he had asked the prosecutor general to interrogate opposition figures in connection with the attack "regardless of democracy, and cries and wailing of foreign sufferers," dubbing political opponents a "fifth column" threatening the country.

"Maybe those politicians from the fifth column will open their cards and show who ordered it," he said.

Human rights activists said prosecutors were summoning opposition members from all over for interrogations.

"Authorities clearly want to use the attack to boost their control over society and carry out new repressions," said Valentina Stefanovich of Vesna, a human rights center.

Lukashenko, dubbed "Europe's last dictator" by the West, had already launched a widespread crackdown on opposition members after mass protests erupted over the December presidential election.

Lukashenko was declared the overwhelming winner of that vote, which international observers strongly criticized and opponents said was rigged.

Lukashenko has run the former Soviet nation of 10 million with an iron fist for nearly 17 years, retaining Soviet-style controls over the economy and cracking down on opposition and independent media.

Belarus is going through a severe economic crisis, with hard currency reserves running critically low and a possible currency devaluation looming.

"Lukashenko needs to find a scapegoat for the disastrous situation in the country," said former presidential candidate Grigory Kostusev, who was jailed during the December rally. He was released and is now facing 15 years in prison for staging the rally.

"With the economic collapse looming, Lukashenko is trying to make the most of it by consolidating public opinion by offering it a theory about foreign enemies from Strasbourg who colluded with the opposition," said independent political analyst Alexander Sosnov.
The Kyiv Post is hosting comments to foster lively public debate through the Disqus system. Criticism is fine, but stick to the issues. Comments that include profanity or personal attacks will be removed from the site. The Kyiv Post will ban flagrant violators. If you think that a comment or commentator should be banned, please flag the offending material.
comments powered by Disqus

KyivPost

© 1995–2014 Public Media

Web links to Kyiv Post material are allowed provided that they contain a URL hyperlink to the www.kyivpost.com material and a maximum 500-character extract of the story. Otherwise, all materials contained on this site are protected by copyright law and may not be reproduced without the prior written permission of Public Media at news@kyivpost.com
All information of the Interfax-Ukraine news agency placed on this web site is designed for internal use only. Its reproduction or distribution in any form is prohibited without a written permission of Interfax-Ukraine.