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Constitutional Court rules Russian, other languages can be used in Ukrainian courts

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Dec. 15, 2011, 12:50 p.m. | Ukraine — by Interfax-Ukraine
The Constitutional Court of Ukraine has ruled that the languages of ethnic minorities can be used in courts across the country, along with the state language. The Constitutional Court of Ukraine issued a relevant resolution in response to a query by 54 people's deputies on Dec. 13 and published it on Dec. 15.

"There are no grounds for recognizing as unconstitutional the provisions of parts 4 and 5 of Article 12 of the law on the judicial system and the status of judges about the use of regional languages or languages of ethnic minorities in courts along with the state language, under the law of Ukraine about the ratification of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages," the Constitutional Court's ruling reads.
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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 1:06 p.m.    

Yes!!! Russian should be given the status of a national language in Ukraine, so that Ukraine has two state langauges - like English and French in Canada.

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 1:17 p.m.    

like french and flamand in belgium

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 3:53 p.m.    

And dutch, Englsih is also being widely recognized.

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 1:29 p.m.    

Like Afrikaans, English, IsiNdebele, IsiXhosa, IsiZulu, Sesotho, sa Leboa, Sesotho, Setswana, siSwati, Tshivenda and Xitsonga in South Africa.

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 8:03 a.m.    

German is the third official language in Belgium

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 1:18 p.m.    

THE SWITZERLAND HAS THREE NATIONAL LINGUAGES : GERMAN - FRENCH - ITALIAN

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 1:55 p.m.    

History lesson: The only reason that the Swiss have these extra official languages, is so they can pretend that they are not a nation of Germans, and thus hide from their history of Nazi collaboration.

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 1:45 p.m.    

4!

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 3:52 p.m.    

Switzerland has four. Canada Tow and in the UK there are six

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 2:03 p.m.    

ROLL ON RUSSIFICATION !!!

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 2:23 p.m.    

Well we DO have a russian government now, nothing Ukrainian about it at all

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 11:42 p.m.    

Ha! Here is a thought for you - may be the little russians want it? After all, they were the ones who elected it and spurned the orange bandits by consigning them to history books.

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 3:49 p.m.    

This isn't really about the right to use another language, its about burying the Ukrainian language.

In time the constitution wont be drafted in Ukrainian and the Ukrainian language wont even be used ceremonially. This government is wiping out Ukrainian culture and heritage. Minority languages?

You wonder if Crimean Tatars will actually get to use their language in court.

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 9:01 p.m.    

Rubbish!

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 3:51 p.m.    

The courts are about seeking justice and rule of law. It should not matter what languages is used. If the court requires then the services of an interpreter needs to be engaged. In a state such as Ukraine which is bilingual then of course those languages should also be allowed. Language is about communication not nationalist politics

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Anonymous Dec. 15, 2011, 5:57 p.m.    

But the Supreme Court judges turned out to be unexpectedly strong-minded, so the Prosecutor General’s office started tightening the screws. Now one of the judges, Mykola Korotkevich, is facing criminal proceedings and four more judges are under threat of dismissal for breaking their oath. Will it be possible to convince the Supreme Court judges to choose the “right” chairman now that they are threatened with criminal prosecution? This is, of course, a rhetorical question.

The government is using all the means at its disposal, including intimidation and criminal prosecution, to put pressure on the judiciary, which should be completely independent. Unlike her ancient namesake, the Ukrainian Lady Justice (Justitia) has put her scales to one side and taken off her blindfold of impartiality. She is looking around in fear. It has come to this: even she is afraid.

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/opinion/op_ed/detail/118906/20/page/1/#comments#ixzz1gcPo80rg

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 12:46 a.m.    

.

Azarov does not speak UKRAINIAN, but he knows how to take UKRAINIANS' money.

Housing for Azarov's family in Austria

The area where the home Azarov is - one of the most prestigious in Vienna. The price of real estate in the eighteenth district is 3.1 - 4.7 thousand euros per square meter.

So, to summarize, we obtain the following picture: While the Prime Minister Azarov does not get tired to call people to tighten belt more tightly, his son lives in Vienna in a luxurious house.

Is this not the epitome of the slogan with which the Party of Regions election went on: &quot;Improving your life today?&quot;

http://www.pravda.com.ua/articles/2011/12/15/6839225/

.

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 12:59 a.m.    

.

Meanwhile:

Azarov wants to return the Russian language to kindergartens?

http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2011/11/11/6747674/

.

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 4:38 a.m.    

For me,

the Russian language is the unstoppable flow of Ukrainian blood spilled by our “elder Russian brother” who, according to his birth records, is by far the younger brother. With this blood we, Ukrainians, have written ourhistory. And when we read our bloody history, we have to take sedatives and ponder the question: why was (is) this relationship called the “friendship of fraternal nations?”

For me,

the Russian language is robbery committed in broad daylight before the eyes of the

entire civilized world: the co-opting of the name of a neighbouring country (Kyivan Rus’-Ukraine) and its inclusion in all the maps of the world by supplanting the term “the state of Muscovy” with the words “Russian Empire” (1713).

For me,

the Russian language is the condemnation and anathema proclaimed by the

Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church against the “new Kyivan books” of the Ukrainian theologians Petro Mohyla, Kyrylo Stavrovetsky-Tranquillon, and Simeon Polotsky (1690).

For me,

the Russian language is the deliberate burning of all the original Ukrainian historical annals, the literary heritage of Kyivan Rus’, the treaties of hetmans Bohdan Khmelnytsky and Ivan Vyhovsky—our historical memory.

For me,

the Russian language is the ukase issued by Tsar Peter I, prohibiting the printing of books in the Ukrainian language and the excision of passages from liturgical books.

For me,

the Russian language is the crucifixion of Ukraine. It is the millions of bones of Ukrainian Cossack prisoners of war, which are literally immured in the foundations of St. Petersburg, the capital of Muscovy (1703); the all-out massacre of the Ukrainian population (over 17,000 men, women and children) of Baturyn, the capital of the Ukrainian Cossack Hetmanate, the day before the Battle of Poltava (1709); the devastation of Zaporozhian Sich Cossack outposts; and the use of Ukrainian forced laborers on the White Sea Canal and other artificial channels.

For me,

the Russian language is the command issued by Tsar Peter III to rewrite, from Ukrainian into Russian, all government decrees and regulations.

For me,

the Russian language is the decree issued by Tsarina Catherine II, forbidding instruction in the Ukrainian language at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (1753).

For me,

the Russian language is the closure of Ukrainian schools attached to regimental Cossack offices and the uninterrupted spilling of Ukrainian blood by the bayonets of

their Muscovite “brothers” (1775).

For me,

the Russian language is “the conquest of Siberia and the subjugation of the Crimea” (a line from Russian playwright Alexander Griboedov’s play Woe from Wit) as promoted by Russia’s poets and painters.

For me,

the Russian language is the sentiment expressed by Russia’s pre-eminent poet Alexander Pushkin: “Humble thyself, O Caucasus, for Yermolov is coming.”

For me,

the Russian language is the deportation of the larger and smaller nations of the Muscovite Empire to “unexplored Siberia.”

For me,

the Russian language is the intensification of the brutal persecution of the Ukrainian language and culture in the 19th century, as exemplified by the prohibition of the finest works of Ukrainian writers.

For me,

the Russian language is the closure of Ukrainian Sunday schools for adults

in the Russian Empire (1862).

For me,

the Russian language is the circular issued by Peter Valuev, tsarist Russia’s Chief of Gendarmes, who banned the printing of spiritual and popular-educational books in the Ukrainian language because “there never was, is not, and never will be a separate Ukrainian language” (1863-1876).

For me,

the Russian language is the declaration of Dmitry Tolstoy, tsarist Russia’s education minister: “The end goal of the education of all foreigners should be their

complete Russification” (1870).

For me,

the Russian language is the Ems Ukase of Tsar Alexander II, which banned Ukrainian performances, the singing of Ukrainian songs, and even the printing of music notes accompanied by Ukrainian-language texts (1876).

For me,

the Russian language is the prohibition against the translation of Russian literature into Ukrainian and the ban on publishing Ukrainian children’s books (1892).

For me,

the Russian language is the closure by tsarist Russia’s Prime Minister Petr Stolypin of all Ukrainian cultural centers, associations, and printing houses; the prohibition against giving lectures in Ukrainian and organizing any kind of non-Russian clubs.

For me,

the Russian language is the resolution passed by the 7th Noble Assembly in Moscow concerning the exclusivity of Russian-language education and the inadmissibility of using other languages of instruction in schoolsthroughout the Russian Empire (1911).

For me,

the Russian language is the interdiction against commemorating the 100th anniversary of Ukraine’s national poet Taras Shevchenko and theliquidation of the Ukrainian press (1914).

For me,

the Russian language is the Russification campaign in western Ukraine, the prohibition on Ukrainian letters, education, and the church (1914-1916).

For me,

the Russian language is the occupation of Ukraine by the Russian Bolsheviks and their red terror, organized by Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin.

For me,

the Russian language is the summary executions of Ukrainian civilians in Kyiv by the cutthroats led by Soviet commander Mikhail Muravev simply because they spoke Ukrainian and some were wearing Ukrainian embroidered shirts (1918).

For me,

the Russian language is the phenomenon of cannibalism during the first and second of the three famines that took place in Ukraine in the

twentieth century (1921, 1932-33).

For me,

the Russian language is the genocide, known as the Holodomor, which killed at least 10 million Ukrainian peasants, the finest farmers in the world, as Stalin informed Churchill during a conversation by indicating all the fingers of his two hands (1933).

For me,

the Russian language is a crime without punishment. It is the Stalin-ordered deaths of tens of thousands of my innocent countrymen in the first days of the Second World War in the park named after the Soviet Russian writer Maxim Gorky in my native city of Vinnytsia.

For me,

the Russian language is the poorly clothed, fed, and armed Ukrainian troops who were used ascannon fodder during World War Two to fend off the Nazi occupiers, who

were armed to the teeth; ditto for the Soviet war in Afghanistan.

For me,

the Russian language is the millions of Ukrainian refugees who fled to the West before the second Soviet invasion of western Ukraine (1943).

For me,

the Russian language is the wholesale deportation of the Chechens and Ingushetians from their native lands during the Second World War. &gt;For me,

For me,

the Russian language is the complete assimilation of the peoples of the Muscovite Empire, be it tsarist, communist, or post-Soviet.

For me,

the Russian language is the pledge “to kill, slaughter, hang, drown, and exile those ‘khokhols,’”the derogatory term with which our “fraternal” neighbors, the Russians,

refer to Ukrainians.

For me,

the Russian language is the political assassinations of the finest sons of my nation not only in Ukraine butoutside its borders.

For me,

the Russian language is Siberia, Kolyma, the Solovetsky Islands, and the hundreds of other death camps in the Soviet GULAG, where the most brilliant Ukrainian

intellectuals of the twentieth century—poets, including blind ones, writers, scholars, academicians, scientists, and clergymen, bishops, and archbishops) met their untimely end.

For me,

the Russian language is 21 January 1978, the day that Oleksa Hirnyk from the city of Kalush went to the gravesite of Ukraine’s national poet Taras Shevchenko in Kaniv,

where he scattered a thousand handwritten leaflets protesting the Russification of the Ukrainian people. Then he doused himself with gas and raised a lighter to his chest. Hirnyk’s death marked the year of the building of the “single Soviet people.”

For me,

the Russian language is Vladimir Putin’s notorious pledge to eradicate the Chechens’ age-old struggle for independence: “We’ll get them anywhere—if we find them sitting in the outhouse, we will rub them out there” (1999).

For me,

the Russian language is the executions of Ukrainian patriots who stood up for their right to speak and write in Ukrainian.

For me,

the Russian language is the language of a fascist, a racist, a chauvinist—and my bitterest enemy.

For me,

the Russian language is the continuing threats made by the Putins, Zhirinovskys, Zatulins, and Luzhkovs of Russia to launch pre-emptive nuclear strikes at Ukraine.

For me,

the Russian language is the continuing cruelty and disrespect shown to my nation by the installation or maintenance of monuments honoring the tsarist and Soviet oppressors of Ukraine (2008).

For me,

the Russian language is the language of an oppressor, a conqueror, and an occupier.

Today, the Russian language in independent Ukraine, if Ukraine is indeed independent, is the death of my Ukrainian language and Ukraine’s final enslavement.

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 8:01 a.m.    

yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaawn

such a sh*t

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 12:48 p.m.    

This is a typical example of little russian mentality - sligh, corrupt to the bone, devious, shallow, perfidious, sinister, criminal, racist, homophobic, unreasonable, drunk, self-defeating and totally defensless. As long as little russians continue to have this despicable attitude, we soldiers of justice and civilisation will prevail!

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Anonymous Dec. 17, 2011, 9:16 p.m.    

Your comment is another reason I call Moskali insanely delusional.

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Anonymous Dec. 19, 2011, 5:28 p.m.    

But we are making history, whereas you my little russian xoxol are on the receiving end of it.

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 12:25 p.m.    

The overwhelming majority of the Ukrainian Diaspora is employed in temporary low income jobs, where no much need of manual dexterity is required and, it goes without saying, no verbal or other intellectual skills are necessary. Having said so, if you are able to find some of them which are not alcoholics and are able to keep their mouth shut, they make good fellows for hard word in masonry and office cleaning.

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Anonymous Dec. 16, 2011, 3:53 p.m.    

The little russian shitaspora is only tolerated in its host countries. They are like leeches sucking blood out of their donors without offering anything in return. Once a stupid drunk xoxol, always a stupid drunk xoxol - live by the same old saying &quot;sho ne zjim, to ponadkusyvaju&quot;.

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Anonymous Dec. 17, 2011, 9:13 p.m.    

&quot;Try to know yourself, your own wickedness. Think on the greatness of God and your wretchedness.&quot;.

PS The Russian Empire {AKA: Muscovy} still exists today, and is trying to expand - and consume and enslave its neighbors.

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/politics/detail/118802/50/page/2/#comment-156938#ixzz1gmoJNs1V

Read more: http://www.kyivpost.com/news/nation/detail/118829/50/page/1/#comments#ixzz1goekWPiD

Read more: http://www.kyivpost.com/news/politics/detail/119120/#ixzz1gouCzoLk

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Anonymous Dec. 17, 2011, 8:49 p.m.    

Ukraine has a legacy stalinist show trial system.

Might as well make the show complete and use the language of stalin.

That way, when Yanusvoloch and his banda come after the rest of Ukrainians that want democracy, noone can say they didn't know.

спасибо жителям Донбаассаааа......

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Anonymous Dec. 20, 2011, 1:11 p.m.    

Kivalov assured that Ukrainian dream come true for Russian language (video)

Kivalov said that soon every Ukrainian can watch TV in Russian.

Every citizen will be able to read, write, plead, see TV - in Russian

http://tsn.ua/politika/kivalov-zapevniv-scho-mriyi-ukrayinciv-pro-rosiysku-movu-zbuvayutsya.html

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/politics/detail/119157/20/page/1/#comments#ixzz1h4XON8DJ

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