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NATO considers Ukraine's behavior 'unprecedented'

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May 25, 2010, 8:56 p.m. | Ukraine — by Interfax-Ukraine
NATO has said there is no precedent to the behavior of Ukraine, which has been working with the Alliance in the frame of the Annual National Program, and yet at the same time announced that it has no plans to join the alliance. "It is an unprecedented experience for a country, which has been working in the frames of the Annual National Program, not to want to become NATO member," NATO Assistant Secretary General for Defense Policy and Planning Jiri Sedivy said at a meeting with Ukrainian reporters.

At the same time, the NATO representative has said that this issue is not a matter of discussion within the alliance. NATO respects Ukraine's decisions, Sedivy said.
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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 9:21 p.m.    

NATO's continued push for Ukraine to join the NATO alliance us strange given that a vast majority of Ukrainians are right opposed to NATO membership. Ukraine is best remaining outside NATO and adopting a policy of Neutrality.

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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 9:35 p.m.    

Maybe, NATO warships should be given similar access to Crimea as Russia has to maintain that &quot;neutrality&quot; LOL

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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 10:32 p.m.    

Hezbollah will get nuclear cannon if that happens.

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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 11:36 p.m.    

If NATO wanted to they could sink the BSF before you could say &quot;shto?&quot;

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 1:21 p.m.    

So what?

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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 11:47 p.m.    

The Constitution of Ukraine prevents any such thing from happening. Only EXISTING foreign bases may continue or start to operate on Ukrainian territory.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 3:19 a.m.    

Russia, until it evolves into a democracy itself, will never respect Ukraine's neutrality.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 1:21 p.m.    

Irrelevant

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Anonymous May 27, 2010, 1:03 a.m.    

Only to Russophiles.

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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 10:43 p.m.    

The best Ukraine can do is to do away completely with cooperation of NATO and join a new Moscow-led military union.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 12:07 a.m.    

A Moscow led so called military alliance would only serve Russia's militaristic and geopolitical interests, not Ukraine's. Aside from that, it would be in contravention of Ukraine's constitution.

The other danger is that Ukraine will be drawn into Russia's conflicts that are happening now in the North Caucasus. Other potential international conflicts may occur with the West over Arctic claims and Moscow's intent to establish a military base in Venezuela that will bring it into direct challenge with the U.S and other South American democracies.

Russia is aggressively persuing it's interests in the Arctic regions through military displays that are designed to bully and intimidate the other Arctic neighbours. Harassing Russian bombers are closely intruding near Canadian airspace before being intercepted and escorted out by armed Canadian fighters. A planned Russian miltary parachute drop onto the North Pole later this spring will further inflame the situation.

Any military alliance with Russia would be of no benefit to Kyiv and would only serve to further isolate and destroy Ukraine's development economically and politically, very much to it's own detriment.

Ukraine must actively engage in it's own geopolitical interests and independence by similarly emulating models of government such as found with Switzerland.

If not, Ukraine will merely become a supplier of subject colonial vassal armies for a militaristic and imperial Russia in support of a hostile Moscow's geopolitical interests throughout the world.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 1:24 a.m.    

well then as you say, NATO also would be in contravention of Ukraine's constitution.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 1:57 a.m.    

The lease renewal of the Russian Black Sea Fleet is a blatant violation Of Ukraine's constitution.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 4:36 a.m.    

not really. the constitution is fuzzy. you are only reading one part of it.

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Anonymous May 27, 2010, 1:07 a.m.    

You think so?

What happens next when the next Ukrainian government declares the lease extention illegal and void followed by measures to evict it?

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 12:41 p.m.    

What a nonsense. Isn't US made Ukraine invovled in Afganistan &quot;antiterror&quot; war and oil war in Iraq. US as NATO leader is always interested to get their NATO allies involved to share costs and improve legitimacy of their geopolitical conquests. your comment is a joke.

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Anonymous May 27, 2010, 1:21 a.m.    

You appear agitated that there are other democratic forces in the world that can see Russia for what it is and have the ability to effectively counter Russian aggression.

The U.S did not &quot;make&quot; Ukraine do anything. Ukraine volunteered forces that were mostly trained in bio-chemical warfare. Their jobs were to search out and neutralize toxic agents. If you have a problem with that, too bad.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 10:59 p.m.    

Best we can do is become isolated from foreign influences to sort ourselves out, much like Japan did.

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Anonymous May 25, 2010, 11:42 p.m.    

all comments are made from russian nationalists living in ukraine,and not from ukrainian people,so dear russian nationalists leave ukraine sovereignity does what is better for ukrainian interest,you are ukrainian guests,so follow ukrainian law,if you don't like,russia is waiting you back......

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 4:44 a.m.    

These &quot;russian nationalists&quot; happen to inhabit more then half of the Ukraine. They may ask you to leave, if you do not like the country. I do not see what makes you so special?

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 7:08 a.m.    

Yanu lost in the majority of Oblasts, and was the first president to be elected with less than an outright majority of voters, so claims of a stong or even widespread mandate aren't supported by facts.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 1:19 p.m.    

Depends if you are counting per head or per kilometer.

Kilometers do not vote but heads do and he won. Get over it.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 10:58 p.m.    

He won because many didn't want Tymoshenko in power.

(remembers gas deal signed by her) (shudders)

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 8:48 p.m.    

what is your point? Clinton won with less than 50% inboth of his terms. The population is bigger in Eastern Ukraine, that is why Yanu won. Geography and how much &quot;land&quot; you won has nothing to with it.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 9:18 a.m.    

Half the country? More like 16%

Population exchange please, bring all the Ukrainians from Siberia, Moscow and god knows where else most of them were deported to home. And take your slave-owner dependents back home.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 12:25 a.m.    

This unprecedented behaviour noted by NATO in Ukraine is reflective of the internal divisions brought on by Yanukovych's government and his sensitivities to the Kremlin's dire objections.

For now, Ukraine's relations with the West is suffering through a Dr. Jekyll and Hyde personality phase brought on by the administrations of toxic serums by the current Yanukovych regime.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 1:25 a.m.    

NATO would be in contravention of Ukraine's constitution.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 3:17 a.m.    

Regardless of any possible constitutional wrangling in the Ukrainian Rada to make this reform to happen, or that ammendment not to happen, what would be of more rational benefit for Ukraine's nationhood in the long run?

If Russia was a democratic nation in full respect of the human values within it's own country as defined by the UN charters of human rights, and if it diplomatically settled territorial disputes with it's other neighbours in full recognition of their total sovereignty, then I would say that Russia could be a possible partner for mutual cooperation. But realistically, this is not going to happen for a long time yet.

Currently, Russia is undergoing another psychotic episode in it's psyche by spreading a rediscovered strain of a virulent ultra nationalism on it's self and the world. Is it healthy for Ukraine to be fully engaged with a manic Russia at this time? Absolutely not a good idea if it wants to survive intact.

The best chance for Ukraine today, whether constitionally correct or not, is to allign it's self with NATO for a time until the Russian 'storm' passes. Unfortunately, the current Russian regime would only perceive a Swiss style example of neutrality for Ukraine as a calf separated from the herd and hunt it as prey in fulfilling it's geopolitical ambitions.

What will happen next in Ukraine's continually unfolding political saga is anyones' guess. No doubt it will bring future surprises, some pleasant and some not so for all the participants and watchers gathered around.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 4:35 a.m.    

ok.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 4:42 a.m.    

Man, you are so lost in the weeds... How many adjectives do you need to pile up when talking about Russia? Ukaine needs alliances that cost money big time like a hole in the head. And the dude who gave the interview is confused big time. He is complaining (whinning), and then proceeds to say that this is Ukainian internal decision to make. Wow. So much immaturity all over the place.

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Anonymous May 27, 2010, 1 a.m.    

Russia is a 'dead end' destination for Ukraine, to put it simply. Can you understand that?

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 10:28 a.m.    

When did Ukraine benefit from having close ties with Russia. .... probably never. Russia is not exectly the cradle of western culture.

The biger problem is that Ukraine is so damaged by Russian-soviet ocupation that it might never recover, I hope it's not true. Most people in Ukraine still consider themselves Ukrainians and eventually more will ebmrace Ukrainian history, language and culture and discard their soviet-russian subservient past and gain more self respect for who they are.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 8:44 p.m.    

Ukraine has always historically been a part of Russia.Without Russia, Ukraine would have been swallowed up by the Turks and Poles, not to mention Germany. Every benefit Ukraine has, has come from the help of its fellow slavic brother.

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Anonymous May 26, 2010, 10:55 p.m.    

Lol what? Ukrainians always held off Turks themselves when the Cossacks existed (Russia destroyed them). Without Russia, Ukraine would be able to concentrate all its resources against Poland, which lets face it is not as powerful as Russia. Without Russia, Germany wouldn't have a war on two fronts during WWI, and so would've won and so WWII wouldn't happen. Might I remind you that it was Germany that liberated Ukraine from the Russian Empire during WWI (a certain treaty of Brest-Litovsk may come to mind).

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