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Update: Stepan Bandera is no longer a Hero of Ukraine

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Jan. 12, 2011, 10:23 a.m. | Ukraine — by Staff reports
The Presidential Administration on Jan. 12 that Stepan Bandera is no longer a Hero of Ukraine, saying a court had cancelled the honor.
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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:08 a.m.    

logical...

Bandera is not a citizen of Ukraine, since he died in 1959 before Ukraine gained independence in 1991.

there is nothing else to add to the above.

cheers

rat-zinger aka bene-dic[t]

LET THE SLEEPING DOGS....

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 1:29 p.m.    

Not logical at all since there are quite a few red army soldiers who also were made &quot;Heroes of Ukraine&quot;. In this case they also should be treated like Bandera.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 2:36 p.m.    

SUCCESSION

the ukraine of today evolved out of the CCCP....

the rest, you work it out yourself...

cheers

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 3 p.m.    

What a smart comment!

Than you'd better read the article above that says &quot;The Ukrainian court DOES NOT RECOGNIZE such a succession&quot;. Which means quite a few red army soldiers should be stripped of this honor just like Bandera has been.

If you need a third explanation on a thing so trivial, let me know...

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Anonymous Jan. 13, 2011, 2:11 a.m.    

you are dreaming of

well,

has nothing in common with

what is generally accepted and practised in the world.

yours is yours

enjoy yourself

cheers,

rat-zinger esq aka bene-dick[t]

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:22 a.m.    

He can not be a hero because my KGB comrades do not kill heroes!!

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:32 a.m.    

This is a situation where a wise leader would have just left well enough alone. Yanukovych is either very stupid or his plan is to divide the country (or possibly both).

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:36 a.m.    

!!

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:45 a.m.    

Bandera is HERO of Ukraine! One day Yanukovich will go away from politics and Bandera will become HERO forever!!

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 2:59 p.m.    

What have you been smoking ?

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 9:03 p.m.    

That's a question you would need to answer given how bewildered your reaction is.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:46 a.m.    

Is it lawful to overturn a Presidential decree in this manner??

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 12:02 p.m.    

In this case it is more than lawful.

Thank you Ukrainian justice.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 2:04 p.m.    

Well, in view of the latest events in Ukraine the words &quot;Ukrainian&quot; and &quot;Justice&quot; do not really belong together.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 10:32 p.m.    

Yushchenko at the time he made this decree was a caretaker Presidnet and had already lost his bid for relecteion having only recived 5% in teh forst round of voting. presidency. Under various conventions, Yushchenko had no right to make any decrees that was not urgent and or did not have the support of the two main contenders. (This is just another example of Yushchenko's disgraceful administration)

Governance by Presidnetial decree is not democracy it is autocracy.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 10:35 p.m.    

If you recall Yushchenko tried to cancel the appointment of a member of Ukraine's Constitutional Court by revoking the previous Presidential decree that was made appointing them. This was a clear bleach of his duty and path to Ukraine

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 10:36 p.m.    

If you recall Yushchenko tried to cancel the appointment of a member of Ukraine's Constitutional Court by revoking the previous Presidential decree that was made appointing them. This was a clear bleach of his duty and oath to Ukraine

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 12:22 p.m.    

Thanks Yanu :)

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 1:21 p.m.    

What a great day for Ukraine !

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 1:31 p.m.    

Perfect, now we should go on and strip all those red army soldiers that also were given this honor...

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 1:58 p.m.    

According to him, Bandera is not a citizen of Ukraine, since he died in 1959 before Ukraine gained independence in 1991.

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/nation/detail/94584/#ixzz1Aoza9K5Z

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 2:01 p.m.    

Normally you are supposed to read the article that you try to comment... The reason why Bandera was stripped of this honor is because he never was a citizen of Ukraine (died before 1991...).

Secondly, Bandera was never found guilty of any crimes neither by Nuremberg Tribunal nor by any German court - and he lived in Germany for years after the war.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 5:46 p.m.    

That presupposes that Ukrainians suddenly emerged in 1991 and did not exist before that date. Ukraine existed as a country long before 1991. The Soviets equated Bandera=Bandit to serve their purposes and that course of action continues. They continue to degraded and defame anything Ukrainian.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 9:09 p.m.    

Well, even if the intellectually handicapped 'regianaly' resort to this kind of argumentation, they should treat EVERYONE equally.

But after all they made two mistakes - first, they used such a foolish argumentation, second, they did not apply it universally.

So much for the pathetic &quot;party&quot; of regions...

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 4:58 p.m.    

The Soviet Red Army were invaders in western Ukraine, and were brutally trying to occupy a foreign country. Bandera was fighting for Ukraine. It is logical that the Russian invaders would paint the local freedom fighter as a bandit because he was against their interests.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 2:57 p.m.    

Bandera committed war crimes and ordinary crimes against the population of Poland and Soviet citizens.

Not Germans.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 3:02 p.m.    

Is there a court judgment from a free country that proves this?

Or like any &quot;soviet&quot; citizen you see what your eyes want to see (or rather what the soviet &quot;ideology&quot; tells you to see)?

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 4:35 p.m.    

and that is the truth

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 9:01 p.m.    

And that is an absolute bullshit - for there is neither proof nor a court judgment. So try to impress with your soviet judgments someone who is susceptible to this level of argumentation...

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 9:46 p.m.    

Martin Luther King, Jr. quotes:

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically… Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.”

“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and consciencious stupidity.”

“The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people.”

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/ukraine/detail/94561/#ixzz1AqtJAk51

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 10:27 p.m.    

Yushchenko at teh time he made this decree had already lost the presidency when he decided to sneak in this decree. Under various conventions, Yushchenko who was a caretaker President, had no right to make any decrees at the time that was not urgent and or did not have the support of the two main contenders. (This is just another example of Yushchenko's disgraceful administration)

Read more: http://www.kyivpost.com/news/nation/detail/94632/#ixzz1Ar3n3T4z

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 10:28 p.m.    

Yushchenko is a disgrace. His term of office was a complete disaster. he had set back Ukraine's democratic development decades if not centuries.

In 2004/5 he had 52% support towards the end of his term of office in january 2010 his support had dropped to just 5%

In the dying days of Yushchenko's term as President he unilaterally decided to award the title of Hero of Ukraine to Bandera, a Nazi Sympathiser during the second world war.

His policies and actions divided Ukraine and certainly did not represent the majority opinion of Ukraine.

Yushenko more then anyone else is responsible for the current situation in Ukraine today. He betrayed all those who had previously supported him.

Most people in Ukraine recognise Yushchenko for what he is, a failed President who betrayed Ukraine and democracy itself. No one supports him and if fresh parliamentary elections were held today his party Our Ukraine would fail to secure representation.

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Anonymous Jan. 12, 2011, 11:39 p.m.    

Russia has increased its leverage in its near abroad over the past few years, allowing Moscow’s foreign policy to evolve into something more flexible and nuanced, particularly in how it handles countries in its periphery. Its relationship with Ukraine is a case in point. With a pro-Russian government in power in Kiev, Russia no longer feels the need to strong-arm Ukraine into cooperation. It has secured its position in the strategic country

Read more: http://www.kyivpost.com/news/opinion/op_ed/detail/94191/#ixzz1ArLsCrq6

Russia has increased its leverage in its near abroad over the past few years, allowing Moscow’s foreign policy to evolve into something more flexible and nuanced, particularly in how it handles countries in its periphery. Its relationship with Ukraine is a case in point. With a pro-Russian government in power in Kiev, Russia no longer feels the need to strong-arm Ukraine into cooperation. It has secured its position in the strategic country

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/opinion/op_ed/detail/94191/#ixzz1ArLsCrq6

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Anonymous Jan. 13, 2011, 2:56 a.m.    

The Usa has no money left. There are other people with money, and they decide now.

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Anonymous Jan. 13, 2011, 2:42 p.m.    

I fully agree.

This multiple personality LES is a real nuisance.

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Eugene Al Gagins Sept. 10, 2012, 2:42 a.m.    

Bandera was an international criminal. As a person who has Polish heritage I am very sad recollecting the atrocities that Bandera was commiting to Polish peasants. Moreover, he was also famous for executing poor Jews. Bandera is the echo of that horrible war....

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