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Yanukovych does not rule out Tigipko as prime minister

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Feb. 15, 2010, 2:01 p.m. | Ukraine — by Reuters

Reuters

Ukrainian President-elect Victor Yanukovych said he would begin talks on forming a new coalition in parliament this week and may invite businessman-turned- politician Sergey Tigipko to serve as prime minister. In a weekend interview with the BBC's Ukrainian service, Yanukovych said agreeing on who should replace Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko -- his rival in the presidential election earlier this month -- would be key to a new coalition. Yanukovych, a burly ex-mechanic and veteran politician, won the election by a narrow margin and was officially declared President-elect on Feb. 14.

But his victory has not been recognised by Tymoshenko, who has accused him of rigging the vote and is likely to appeal the result.

Although she is unlikely to succeed, the move will prolong uncertainty in Ukraine, which has been hit by an economic crisis and is making do without a $16.4 billion IMF programme, suspended last year.

"I do not rule out the candidature of Tigipko. Tigipko is on the list which, in my opinion, will be discussed next week in parliament," Yanukovych said.

"I understand very well that the coalition will be created around the candidature of the next prime minister, so I will encourage the process of unifying parliament and the negotiating process will show how much parliament is willing to unite around one or another candidate," he said.

Tigipko returned to politics in the past year and secured for himself a strong negotiating position after he came a strong third in the first round of voting.

But other candidates have been touted too, among them former finance minister Mykola Azarov, who is a loyal ally of Yanukovych, and Arseniy Yatsenyuk, a young former finance minister and one-time Speaker of parliament.

Yanukovych's supporters in parliament face a daunting task in creating a new coalition -- they must persuade other parties to join them as well as some supporters of current President Victor Yushchenko, traditional rivals of Yanukovych.
The Kyiv Post is hosting comments to foster lively debate. Criticism is fine, but stick to the issues. Comments that include profanity or personal attacks will be removed from the site. If you think that a posted comment violates these standards, please flag it and alert us. We will take steps to block violators.
Anonymous Feb. 15, 2010, 2:22 p.m.    

They must persuade either Block Yulia Tymsohenko or Our Ukraine-Peoples self defense to support the formation of a new coalition. Under the provisions of Ukraine's Constitution the formation of a governing coalition requires the support of faction (not individuals) that represent a majority of the parliament. Without either Our Ukraine- peoples' self defense or Bloc Tymoshenko the only other way to form a governing coalition is to hold fresh parliamentary elections

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Anonymous Feb. 15, 2010, 2:32 p.m.    

Current faction numbers

Party of Regions 175

Bloc Yulia Tymoshenko 156

Our Ukraine-People's Self Defense 72

Communist Party 27

Bloc Lytvyn 20

Minimum Total needed to form governing coalition 226

Party of Regions can only form a governing coalition with the support of either Our Ukraine-Peoples Self defense or Block Tymoshennko.

Article 83 of Ukraine's constitution

...

According to election results and on the basis of a common ground achieved between various political positions, a coalition of parliamentary factions shall be formed in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine to include a majority of People’s Deputies of Ukraine within the constitutional composition of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine.

A coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine shall be formed within a month from the date of the first meeting of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine to be held following regular or special elections to the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, or within a month from the date when activities of a coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine terminated.

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Anonymous Feb. 15, 2010, 2:56 p.m.    

Your argument is flawed, because you assume that members of Our Ukraine and BYuT won't join another faction. Goodbye, Yulia.

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Anonymous Feb. 16, 2010, 7:26 a.m.    

Unless they agree to join as a whole they are prevented form doing so under Ukraine's Imperative mandate rules. Read the Venice Commission report and Ukraine's constitution.

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Anonymous Feb. 16, 2010, 7:31 a.m.    

Under the terms of Ukraine's constitution only Factions can become members of the governing coalition. Our Ukraine - peoples Self Defense would have to agree to join. IE 37 members of more which collectively make up a majority of the faction and carry all 72 members votes.

Article 83 of Ukraine's constitution.

...

According to election results and on the basis of a common ground achieved between various political positions, a coalition of parliamentary factions shall be formed in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine to include a majority of People’s Deputies of Ukraine within the constitutional composition of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine.

A coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine shall be formed within a month from the date of the first meeting of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine to be held following regular or special elections to the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, or within a month from the date when activities of a coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine terminated.

A coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine submits to the President of Ukraine, in accordance with this Constitution, proposals concerning a candidature for the office of the Prime Minister of Ukraine and also, in accordance with this Constitution, submits proposals concerning candidatures for the membership of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine.

Framework for forming, organising, and terminating activities of a coalition of parliamentary factions in the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine shall be established by the Constitution of Ukraine and the Rules of Procedure of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine.

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Anonymous Feb. 15, 2010, 3:29 p.m.    

If Tigipko is prepared to accept the PM job then Yanukovich ought to let him have it.

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Anonymous Feb. 15, 2010, 9:11 p.m.    

What's so good about Tgipko. What does anyone know about him? And how will he get enough deputies to support him?

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Anonymous Feb. 18, 2010, 12:23 p.m.    

A good read on his past is: VIRTUAL POLITICS: FAKING DEMOCRACY IN THE POST-SOVIET WORLD By Andrew Wilson (Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut, 2005). Not for one moment he looks “honest” in this book…

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Anonymous Feb. 16, 2010, 11:19 a.m.    

Why is Tigipko spelt with a &quot;G&quot; ?

Shouldnt it be Tihipko with a &quot;H&quot; as in Тігіпко ?

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Anonymous Feb. 16, 2010, 2:09 p.m.    

Because his father (and surname) is Moldavian.

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