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Food Critic: Traditional cheesecake for Easter

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April 12, 2012, 9:28 p.m. | Food & Nightclubs — by Katya Gorchinskaya

Katya Gorchinskaya

Editor

Although you’re most likely to eat baked Easter cakes on Ukraine’s Easter, which comes on April 15 this year, the traditional Easter cake was made out of cottage cheese and required no baking. The recipe is very easy, and equally delicious.

This one comes from a contributor to Edim Doma, a Russian website that specializes in cooking, and is well worth trying.

You will need:


3 packs of cottages cheese, 550 grams each
2 eggs
130 grams of sugar
200 grams of smetana, or sour cream
100 grams of butter
3 table spoonfuls of sweetened condensed milk
40 grams of raisins
40 grams of dried cranberries
peel of half a lemon, vanilla


Start by separating the eggs. Beat the yolks in a blender with sugar until it’s creamy and white.

Add the smetana, condensed milk, lemon peel and vanilla, and beat again. Mix in the raisins and cranberries.

Whisk the egg whites to soft peaks, and carefully fold them into the egg yolk mixture.

Line a sieve or Easter cake form with two layers of muslin cloth, making sure the ends hang off the form.

Spoon the mixture into the form, cover with the hanging ends of muslin.

Weigh it down with a load, and leave in a cold pantry or refrigerator for 24 hours.

If the cake remains too moist after that, leave it for longer to squeeze all the moisture out.

Then turn the cake out onto a plate, and decorate with nuts, dried fruit or candy. Enjoy!
The Kyiv Post is hosting comments to foster lively debate. Criticism is fine, but stick to the issues. Comments that include profanity or personal attacks will be removed from the site. If you think that a posted comment violates these standards, please flag it and alert us. We will take steps to block violators.
Mykhayl April 14, 2012, 3:14 a.m.    

Христос Воскрес ! Во истину воскрес !

Katya Gorchinskaya QUOTE: "...Although you’re most likely to eat baked Easter cakes on Ukraine’s Easter, which comes on April 15 this year, the traditional Easter cake was made out of cottage cheese and required no baking. The recipe is very easy, and equally delicious. This one comes from a contributor to Edim Doma, a Russian website that specializes in cooking, and is well worth trying..." QUIT QUOTE

Why didn't you just start with the Soviet Alumn salutation “The Moscow Patriarch found the bones of Christ!”? You claim it is Ukraine’s Holiday than go to a Russian website...?

Did you even try Googling “Ukrainian Easter”? My search results started with…

http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/ukrainianbreads/r/paska.htm

http://www.food.com/recipe/ukrainian-easter-bread-paska-218638

http://suburbangrandma.com/culture/traditional-easter-bread-paska-recipe/

http://www.learnpysanky.com/recipes/paska.html

Even Martha Stewart who says she is Polish though her Mom speaks Ukrainian had Ukrainian Easter recipes:

http://www.marthastewart.com/335348/ukrainian-easter-bread

and 52,595 more result following.

Are you just waiting for a job opening at the KIEV POST? Anyone even vaguely versed in cosine would suspect syrna pascha is no more ours than Chicken Kiev or really Russian than their French and Italian chefs. That would be like eluding jalapeno pepper pyroghies were a Ukrainian vareneky recipe.

By the way, anything with any egg unless it be powdered its unsafe without a minimum of cooking. Farmer's or curd cheese is a better base or if unavailable use ricotta before cottage cheese. If interested I’ll give you my recipe. Bottom line it is not what but how, all Ukrainian Pascha (Easter) foods are precooked and on Sunday served cold as would a kosher house on Sabbath. Some of he confusion is because we are mixing languages or forget there are other regions. Simply Pascha is the holiday so paska or pascha is a Ukrainian semi-sweet, egg rich Easter bread, always round sometimes with dough ornaments. Paskha is also Russian for a sweet pyramid-molded dessert cheese with dried fruit and nuts served at Easter. Syrna paska is a Ukrainian cheese cake; similar to Russian paskha above but any dried fruit is often only a decorative toping. Babka or baba is a Ukrainian sweet egg-enriched Easter souffle' bread, usually with brandied raisins baked in a tin cans to a tall stature. It is often iced with confectionary glaze in candle drops decoration, holding a lighted candle taper that keeps the horizontal slices in line, which is used to serve the syrna paska on. Kulich is a Russian Easter bread, usually similar to Ukrainian babka above but kneaded with dried fruit and nuts more like a stollen. Many Ukrainians speakers of Russian, especially in Eastern Ukraine confuse terminology and even transpose customs, or cultures, histories, languages and allegiants. Is this the KYIV POST or the KIEV POST?

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