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Jamestown Foundation: Yushchenko and Yanukovych forge an electoral alliance

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Jan. 6, 2010, 8:57 a.m. |
Taras Kuzio writes:On Dec. 25, UNIAN published a secret agreement “On Political Reconciliation and the Development of Ukraine” leaked by Yaroslav Kozachok, the deputy head of the presidential secretariat’s department on domestic affairs and regional development. Kozachok resigned in protest at the secret agreement between President Viktor Yushchenko and Party of Regions leader Viktor Yanukovych to appoint the former as Prime Minister in the event of Yanukovych’s election. Read the story here.
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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 9:24 a.m.    

Nothing will change after the elections. The oligarchs will throw another party and the president will fill his pockets together with his compagnions. Ukraine is politically dead.

Long live Ukraine!

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 12:04 p.m.    

How a "secret agreement" can be secret if anybody knows (speaks) about it? :D :D

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 1:47 p.m.    

"Kozachok resigned in protest"

He did not resign, has already resigned or been sacked, which puts a completly different complexion on things and Kuzio knows that so why he is making things up?

Secondly the whole article is a waste of time and space because as Kuzio writes himself:

"Yushchenko will be unable to ensure that a parliamentary majority will vote for him"

Kuzio knows that and everyone else does too. They're not stupid either.

So the whole thing just written as another series in Kuzio's tedious efforts to discredit Yushchenko because as other commentators have pointed out he can't write anything good about Tymoschenko - the best he can do is blame Yushchenko for all her failures even though as he points out she is sitting in most constiutionally powerful position. How's would she do any better in a less powerful position ie that of President?

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 5:26 p.m.    

Kuzio is the only one still desperately trying to peddle this ridiculous forgery.

Why? Because his masters at BYuT told him to, of course.

Really, Taras, this is the final nail in the coffin of any vestigial credibility you may have once had. You have sold out to BYuT so completely and utterly that there's nothing left to sell. I only hope the price was worth it? Promised advisory position? Contracts for Taras Kuzio Associates?

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 3:39 p.m.    

The whole presidential election is a farce, a complete waste of time, money and resources. Ukraine would be better off without a president and the head of state should be elected by a constitutional majority of the parliament as is the case in Estonia, Latvia, Hungary, Moldova, Greece, Czech Republic Switzerland and the EU. cost zero. Greater accountability, more stable and more representative.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 4:36 p.m.    

Only in the mind of a particular spammer does the notion of taking the vote away from the people, and giving it to a group of legally unaccountable oligarchs seem more "democratic" than a direct plebicite... It's absured on its face. Upwards of 80% of Ukrainians prefer a strong president who is directly elected by the people. That's because Ukrainians know what democracy actually means. As for the cost, it's either spent electing a president with a popular mandate, or it will disappear into the black-hole of the Ukrainian parliamentary circus.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 9:38 p.m.    

LOL... Estonia, Latvia, Hungary, Moldova, Greece, Czech Republic Switzerland and the EU all elect their head of state by a constitutional majority of their directly elected parliament.

Even the USA does not directly elect their president.

A parliamentary collegiate election of head of state is just as democratic if not more so then a direct election model. It certainly is more effective and more representative.

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 12:02 a.m.    

France elects its President in the same way than Ukraine. And it was a choice made by referendum 45 years ago as before the President was elected by Parliament. France has got a very bad memory of the 4th Republic after WWII when the institution were the one described by you: a Parliament without stable majority, a President elected by Parliament and government changing every 6 months. France was unable to be ruled at that time exactly as Ukraine today with its current Constitution,. Ukraine needs his De Gaulle, and Iulia looks as the only one in Ukraine to be this personnality today

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 9:43 p.m.    

The money hasd poored into a black hole. If you think this circus is democracy then think again. A presidential system is not democracy it is autocracy. True democracy can only exists under a parliamentary system.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 11:51 p.m.    

Apparently you just randomly string words together in the hope of making a coherent statement. Here are some simple facts that would shut you up if you actually had a working braincell.

1) The changes required to adopt a parliamentary system would need to be approved by the Ukrainian people in a public referendum.

2) The Ukrainian people prefer a presidential system with direct elections by a margin of over 80%

3) Case closed, you loose, now go home!

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 2:53 a.m.    

You obviously do not know what your taking about as the information you have presented is false.

Two thirds of the parliament is required to amend Ukraine's Constitution. (Article 155) A referendum is only required to amend provisions of Chapters I, III and XIII. (Article 156)

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Anonymous Jan. 9, 2010, 1:37 a.m.    

Article 5

- Ukraine is a republic.

- The people are the bearers of sovereignty and the only source of power in Ukraine. The people exercise power directly and through bodies of state power and bodies of local self-government.

- The right to determine and change the constitutional order in Ukraine belongs exclusively to the people and shall not be usurped by the State, its bodies or officials.

- No one shall usurp state power.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 11:09 p.m.    

Only in the mind of a particular spammer does the notion of taking the vote away from the people, and giving it to a group of legally unaccountable oligarchs seem more "democratic" than a direct plebicite... It's absured on its face. Upwards of 80% of Ukrainians prefer a strong president who is directly elected by the people. That's because Ukrainians know what democracy actually means. As for the cost, it's either spent electing a president with a popular mandate, or it will disappear into the black-hole of the Ukrainian parliamentary circus.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 2:58 a.m.    

Ukraine had only been a semi democratic state since 2006. France is an established State. If it was designing its system of governance today it would not support a Presidential system. There are significant restrictions by law and convention on the acts of the head of state. It is not a good model for Ukraine. Estonia and Latvia, Hungary and Czech Republic is a better option. All are Parliamentary democracies and all elected their head of state by a constitutional majority of the palram net

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 1:38 a.m.    

The current system is NOT a presidential system. If it were, we would have far greater stability today. The current mess stems from the unclear, and overlapping division of powers that came about as a result of the hasty and ill advised compromise Yuschenko agreed to to get rid of Kuchma.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 3:50 p.m.    

Yushchenko must come clean and stop lying, He lied about being in talks with other candidates about supporting a single candidate and he is lying about his intentions. He has effectively been campaigning for Yanukovych for the duiration of the campain No one trusts him anymore.

Yushchenko is a failed president

He has betrayed all those who supported his election.

Yushchenko has the highest negativity retaing (83%) of all candidates. Yushchenko is a liability not an asset.

If Yanukovych has offered Yushchenko a sweat heart deal in return for his support then he Must make it public now before the election not after it. Any deal with Yushchenko will only undermine Yanukovych's own credibility and give cause for Ukraine to support Tymoshenko.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 7:26 p.m.    

Dear Editor

Why can't you delete this comment. It is the 1000th time it's been posted. Why is someone allowed to cut and paste the same thing again and again, whatever the article is about? It ruins all the comments' sections. Delete is a few times and it will stop.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 9:34 p.m.    

This is actually the first time this comment has been made.

Each article stands alone and the comment is just as relevant.

Now we know you do not like free speech and democratic values. If you do not like what is being said then I suggest you ignore it or provide some other argument other then censorship.

QUOTE:

"If Yanukovych has offered Yushchenko a sweat heart deal in return for his support then he Must make it public now before the election not after it. Any deal with Yushchenko will only undermine Yanukovych's own credibility and give cause for Ukraine to support Tymoshenko."

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 9:28 p.m.    

Free Speech? Your idea of demoCRAATSy differs from the norm.

In 2004, you did exactly the same for Yanukovych's PoR. Now you're back doing the same for Tymoshenko. Have you seen the light or the dollar bills?

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 4:21 a.m.    

More attempts at preventing policial debate and comments that are critical of Yushechnko or the presidential system.

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 5:06 p.m.    

Yuschenko still controls a very important constituency of the Ukrainian electorate. He may yet force Yatseniuk out of the race and thereby become a candidate capable of winning 12-15 percent.

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 9:24 p.m.    

Unfortunately it won't. The man makes a living cutting and pasting - it pays better than beating people up at Australian council elections.

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Anonymous Jan. 6, 2010, 11:08 p.m.    

I agree, this type of flooding makes your site unreadable. I will be going elsewhere.

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 5:04 p.m.    

Kuzio is really flailing in the wind now, this is desperate stuff indeed. What's more worrisome is that Kuzio may take the Jamestown Foundation's reputation down into the gutter along with his own.

By the way, Taras, how did you like that profile of Yulia Tymoshenko in the New Republic?

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 3:30 a.m.    

Now your trying to silence and influence the Jamestown Foundation's editorial policy. Best of luck. If anything it does not do your own reputation any good.

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from richard Jan. 7, 2010, 7:36 p.m.    

Kuzio! Kuzio! Why do you write such pathetic blatant propaganda? You insult the average Kyiv Post reader with this stuff.

Kyiv Post - I'd much prefer it if you employed Cherkasy as a Staff Writer. He has much more relevant things to say about Ukraine in the international context. And he can speak Ukrainian! More than one can say for Kuzio's recent attempt on tv in which his bizarre utterances where shot down in flames by the Regions speaker!

Please, Kyiv Post. Stop insulting us with this stuff, and get some people on the ground, who know, and are in touch with what is really going on in Ukraine; not some half-baked Brit in Canada on a fun Yulia-paid sabatical!

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Anonymous Jan. 7, 2010, 11:03 p.m.    

I don't read Kuzio articles any longer, because I learned after some time, all his articles sound like something written by a drunken sailor. He's now scraping the bottom of the barrel for his articles. To bad he "NEVER" has any documentation to back his words. Even after a change in ownership, Kyivpost still pushes his diatribe.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 12:49 a.m.    

Kuzio is a failed "academic" who has resorted to his last chance at "stardom" by writing freshman level, tabloid articles demonizing anyone who is in competition with Tymoshenko. It should be noted that Kuzio has yet to write an article extoling the virtues of his Yulia. He is locked into writing smear articles about Yushchenko and Yatseniuk. If Kuzio was a true academic he would give us some facts about Tymoshenko that would pursued people to vote for her instead of against others. Sadly, Kuzio has failed as both an "academic" and an Op Ed writer. Kuzio cannot be taken seriously, perhaps after the elections he can get a job writing for the National Enquirer.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 7:57 p.m.    

For the record, this is not true. Kuzio wrote a big article for Jamestown claiming the supposed virtues of YT's (undoubtedly pro-Moscow) foreign policy. His arguments were borderline ridiculous, but at least he made the effort.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 5:23 a.m.    

if you do not read them then why are you commenting on something your have not read. LOL. clearly your not an informed participant, your only reason for commenting is to trash and burn as you get your rocks off.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 4:19 a.m.    

Kuzio's assessment and analysis has credibility. The suggestion that a deal and alliance between Yanukovych and Yushchenko is realistic. Yushchenko has consistently advocated a broad coalition with party of Regions. If fresh parliamentary elections were held today Party of regions would fall only a few votes short from securing a majority on their own right. They will have the choice of coalition partners. it is the same agreement that Yushenko and Yanukovych tried to reach in the leadup to the agreemnt to hold a fresh election 2007 following Our Ukraine's failue to form a coalition back in 2006.

QUOTE

Yushchenko has always wavered between supporting a grand coalition with the Party of Regions or a “democratic” coalition with the Tymoshenko bloc (BYuT). Following the March 2006 elections Yushchenko sent the Prime Minister (and head of Our Ukraine) Yuriy Yekhanurov to negotiate a grand coalition and Roman Besmertnyi to form a “democratic” coalition. Following the dissolution of parliament in April 2007, Yushchenko negotiated a compromise with the Party of Regions to hold pre-term elections in September in exchange for a grand coalition. During the 2007 election campaign Yushchenko campaigned for a “democratic” coalition, which was established with Tymoshenko as its candidate for prime minister in December 2007. Raisa Bohatyriova, the head of the Party of Regions parliamentary faction, was appointed as secretary of the National Security and Defense Council (NRBO) who, together with the presidential secretariat head Viktor Baloga, spent 2008 seeking to undermine the Tymoshenko government in which Yushchenko had demanded that half the cabinet posts go to Our Ukraine.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 4:51 a.m.    

Show your documentation that what you're alleging is a fact. Just because you or someone else in another news article says its true, it is suppose to be? You just wasted you typing for nothing, because you can't back it with facts. Anyone can paint a different picture with a similar scenario. Good try though.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 5:28 a.m.    

QUOTE form Yuri-Kharkov from Odessa.

"I don't read Kuzio articles any longer"

If you do not read his articles then how are you able to make an informed assessment of what it is he has said. Or are you just engaged in a trash and burn attack on Kyiv Post and those who are better informed then you.

For someone who claims he does not read Kuzio you continue to post irrational comments and abuse on his personal blog and here on Kyiv post.

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from richard Jan. 8, 2010, 2:29 p.m.    

One other thought:

What Kuzio is trying to do in this article is to provide "support" to his beloved Yulia. He has already appeared on various Forums with her.

But - paradoxically, suggesting that Yushchenko would find the time to discuss things with Yanukovych actually gives Yanuk more credibility. This article actually helps Yanukovych - not that he needs any help; he's so far ahead in the polls, he can't be stopped now - not with eight full days left before voting.

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Anonymous Jan. 8, 2010, 3:08 p.m.    

What you are trying to do is deflect criticism away from Yushchenko by promoting misinformation, lies and deceit. Muddy the water. Next you will be denying the holocaust or the fact that Yushchenko has only 4% support and state that Yushchenko has 25% based on the assumption that the percentage of unknown/undecided are all Yushchenko votes. Maybe as anther post has stated if Ukraine had adopted preferential instant run-off voting Yushchenko could survive but I doubt it.

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Anonymous Jan. 10, 2010, 5:26 a.m.    

If Ukraine had adopted preferntial voting and Yushen ko was able to collect votes form other Our Urkaine candidates at best he would have 12%. Tigipko would pick up votes from most of the other candidates bring him above Yushchenko on 15% if Yushchenko's voets then flowed to Tigipko then yes maybe he could out poll Tymoshenko who would then top up his own vote to win the election.

But is is clear that even under a preferential voting system Yushchenko could not win. Yatseniuk would out poll him and collect Yushchenkos support but he also would fall short wit less then 12% overall support. Tigipko is the only possible upset candidate under a preferential ballot.

With the first past the post 'highest vote wins" system Yanukovych and Tymohenko are the only two that will progress to a second round vote.

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Anonymous Jan. 10, 2010, 5:06 a.m.    

Congratulations to the Kyiv Post, Jamestown Foundation and Kuzio for publishing factual insights into Ukrainian politics and for Kyiv Posts summary. Kuzio's comments have been backup and are reflected in comments by a number of other well placed and informed sources. Thos here that seek to trash the sight in protest do so to prevent the open and informed debate - they bring them selves and Yushchenko into disrepute. Little wonder why Yushenko has such low rating with supporters like these.

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Anonymous Jan. 10, 2010, 9:08 p.m.    

This article is a piece of garbage, period.

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Anonymous Jan. 11, 2010, 4:43 p.m.    

Kuzio notes that "the Orange electorate is larger" [than the core Yanukovich electorate]. But he does not add that it is larger only by a few (5-7) percent. Therefore, Tymoshenko would have to hold the entire Orange electorate with a maximum defection rate of about 3 percent, in order to win. The real Orange defection rate from Tymoshenko is likely to be at least 15 percent, or quite possibly higher.

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