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Yushchenko’s hand in the imprisonment of Yulia Tymoshenko

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Nov. 15, 2011, 5:58 p.m. | Op-ed — by Taras Kuzio

None

Taras Kuzio

Special to Kyiv Post

Editor’s Note: The following opinion piece originally appeared on The Jamestown Foundation website.

Former President Viktor Yushchenko is an important, but underestimated, aspect of the sentencing of opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko to seven years imprisonment and a three-year ban from government work. Our Ukraine honorary chairman Yushchenko’s support for the sentence was in contradiction with the Our Ukraine political party, which condemned it as a return to authoritarianism. Every other opposition political party condemned the sentence. Party of Regions deputy Taras Chornovil said in a recent interview with Radio Svoboda that “Yushchenko was the only well-known public person in Ukraine who supported the sentence.” Yushchenko was the only person who “applauded and said that he supported it and was satisfied with it”

In interviews given to the BBC Ukrainian service on Oct. 12 and Der Spiegel on Oct. 18, Yushchenko publicly supported Tymoshenko’s sentence. Speaking on Inter television channel on Oct. 23, Yushchenko stated his opposition to the decriminalization of the 1962 Soviet criminal articles that were included in the 2001 Ukrainian criminal code used to sentence Tymoshenko. Officials, he argued, should be held responsible for their actions. The EU had sought to use decriminalization as a compromise for Yanukovych to release Tymoshenko.

Former U.S. Ambassadors to Ukraine, William Taylor and Steven Pifer, described the trial as a “farce.” Yushchenko, in contrast, said it was a “rather a normal judicial process,” believing the charges arose from her “treason.” Yushchenko continued: “I do not see a show trial, but rather a normal judicial process. Even politicians are not above the law. Was not the former French President Jacques Chirac also forced to stand trial?” he asked.

Former Kyiv Mayor Oleksandr Omelchenko, elected to parliament in the pro-Yushchenko Our Ukraine-Peoples Self Defense, believes that Yushchenko’s support for the sentence is a product of his personality as he showed himself to be a “very low moral person” who “betrayed tens of millions of people.” Omelchenko and other Orange politicians have pointed to Yushchenko continuing to live in the president’s dacha as a “reward” for his anti-Tymoshenko vendetta.

Yanukovych lives in his palatial Mezhirya, a former Soviet complex privatized when he was prime minister in 2006-2007, and does not need the president’s official residence. A Razumkov Center opinion poll conducted one week after the sentence confirmed Omelchenko’s views, finding Yushchenko to have the highest negative rating of any Ukrainian politician. Indeed, 80 percent of Ukrainians did not support his actions, higher than the Communist Party leader Petro Symonenko who had minus 69 percent ratings. Only 1.5 percent of Ukrainians supported Yushchenko.

Party of Regions deputies have pointed out that the criminal investigation against Tymoshenko was launched in 2008-2009 by Yushchenko and they have merely brought the case to its logical conclusion.
The Tymoshenko case has had three stages. The first stage in the summer of 2008 was the collection of a dossier of Tymoshenko’s alleged “treason” by the presidential secretariat (Yushchenko has continued to use her “treason” to justify his support for the sentence).

The “research” operation was led by then chief of staff, Viktor Baloga, who resigned in May 2009 after which he defected to Yanukovych. During the 2010 presidential elections Baloga organized victory for Yanukovych in Transcarpathia, the only western Ukrainian region which he won. In October 2010, Baloga was appointed as the Minister of Emergency Situations.

During the second stage, Yushchenko undermined his prime minister’s 2010 election campaign. Yushchenko signed into law increases in populist social benefits that led to a suspension of the 2008 International Monetary Fund loan agreement and signed last minute changes to the election law that increased opportunities for election fraud.

In his final press conference, Yushchenko revived criminal charges from the Leonid Kuchma-era related to Tymoshenko’s chairmanship of United Energy Systems in 1995-1997. The same charges were revived on Oct. 12; the day after Tymoshenko was sentenced, by the Security Service.

The intervention by the SBU chairman, Valeriy Khoroshkovsky, is the latest in a string of similar steps that seek to destroy Ukraine’s European integration. In the second round of the 2010 elections Yushchenko called upon Ukrainians to vote against both candidates which only reduced Tymoshenko’s vote.

Between the first and second rounds, Yushchenko posthumously awarded the nationalist leader Stepan Bandera with a state medal, which increased the anti-nationalist turn-out of eastern Ukrainian voters.

The third step in January 2009 was marked by Khoroshkovsky’s promotion by Yushchenko to first deputy chairman of the SBU. Three months later Khoroshkovsky ordered the SBU’s Alpha Spetsnaz unit to raid Naftohaz Ukraine’s offices over the January gas contract.

The contract became the basis for the charge of “abuse of office” against Tymoshenko. Our Ukraine leader and former SBU Chairman, Valentyn Nalyvaychenko, said in an interview with Komentari on March 5, 2010 that “it would be personal satisfaction” if Khoroshkovsky was promoted to the post of SBU chairman, “which he had recommended him for.” Khoroshkovsky became the SBU chairman shortly afterwards.

Yushchenko’s anti-Tymoshenko vendetta has brought three negative consequences for Ukraine. First, it has led to widespread voter disenchantment and disillusionment in Ukrainian politicians, especially among former Orange voters.

This has generated passivity among Ukrainians making it easier for Yanukovych to roll back the democratic gains achieved in the 2004 Orange Revolution. Only 3,000 Ukrainians protested against Tymoshenko’s sentence – fewer in number than the Berkut riot police who had been drafted into Kyiv.

Moreover, Ukraine fatigue undermined Ukraine’s integration into NATO, which looked promising in 2005-2006. Khoroshkovsky’s SBU is a major factor in contributing to Ukraine’s democratic regression. Yushchenko’s support for Tymoshenko’s sentence undermines his claim to be a supporter of Ukraine’s European integration as the case has derailed the chances of Kyiv signing an Association Agreement.

Finally, Ukraine fatigue led most countries to initially welcome Yanukovych’s victory because they believed it would end “Orange” chaos and bring “stability.” Yanukovych was therefore given a long honeymoon period for most of 2010 during which criticism of democratic regression was mooted and phrased diplomatically.

Political repression of dozens of opponents only led to negative consequences in EU-Ukraine relations after August 5, 2011, when Tymoshenko was imprisoned for contempt of court.

Yushchenko’s support for Tymo­shenko’s sentence reveals political immaturity, a lack of dignity and willingness to prioritize personal revenge over Ukraine’s national interests. In 2006 and 2011, respectively, he has supported policies that have undermined Ukraine’s path to NATO and the EU.

Taras Kuzio is a senior fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Washington DC
The Kyiv Post is hosting comments to foster lively debate. Criticism is fine, but stick to the issues. Comments that include profanity or personal attacks will be removed from the site. If you think that a posted comment violates these standards, please flag it and alert us. We will take steps to block violators.
Anonymous Nov. 15, 2011, 6:48 p.m.    

They should lock them up together so they can pleasure each other.

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Mykhayl Nov. 15, 2011, 8:16 p.m.    

Well, well.

The identity thief is back showing how corrupt even the KIEV POST and commenters can be made to appear.

Volva,

I haven't died, I went on a weekend vacation.

Speak for yourself, give your &quot;VAN the MAN&quot; backbone some starch.

KYIV POST readers if I want credit I'll sign in as I did this time.

Note the difference between anonymous guests and signed in commenter.

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Anonymous Nov. 15, 2011, 7:48 p.m.    

Back when Yulia and Lutsenko were out campaigning for Orange, when they won enough votes for Orange to have a majority in the VR, Yush, did his best even then to undermine her, trying for a grand coalition with PoR, instead of with his coalition partner BYuT.

Even on Day 1 of Yulia becoming PM, Yush and Baloha, set to work publicly undermining her and criticizing her, almost without fail...every day. Yulia remained silent for awhile, trying to work with them, but eventually she also started to attack.

Go back to 2004, during the Orange Revolution. Yulia and Lutsenko were at the forefront of the peaceful demonstrations, while Yush was hiding at home. When he was convinced it was safe, he started appearing at the demonstrations, but without Yulia and Lutsenko, it would have gone no where. Now...these two hero's are sitting in jail and Yush is enjoying his many mansions and wealth. He would have had none of this had it not been for Yulia and Lutsenko.

There hardly passed a day when Yulia was PM that Yush and Baloha didn't attack her publicly. They worked together with PoR to undermine her...Every Step Of The Way. It made no difference if her policies were good for the people or the country...they undermined her. Yush hated her beyond all logic and as a result sold his country back to the hardliners of PoR who have completely undermined democracy in Ukraine.

I've come to the conclusion that Yush advanced democracy in Ukraine for only one reason and that was to get money from the West. He could not turn to Russia as he hated Russia. Look at his scared face and you can understand why. Sadly, once he made a few steps towards democracy, he stopped, which to me was further truth to the fact that he cared little about democracy and was just another one of those Ukrainian politicians who were in it for greed and power.

Had it not been for politicians like Yush and Yats who thought they would be a part of the new administration and their efforts against Yulia in the presidential election, Yanu would not have won this election. They chose greed and power over the people for this authoritarian regime that made fools of them by putting together an illegal coalition and leaving Yush and Yats out of it.

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Mykhayl Nov. 15, 2011, 8:21 p.m.    

Like Volva and kutsups, undermine Ukrainians.

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Anonymous Nov. 15, 2011, 8:47 p.m.    

And yet 15% delusional Ukrainians STILL support Yuschenko? That is what makes me weep. Every nation has its traitors and Yusch will go down in Ukrainian history as one who destroyed something truly precious - the hope of Ukrainian youth.It was a time of such great promise. The world supported Ukraine and marvelled at its will after so many hundreds of years of oppression and one man destroyed it all.

and yet he goes to church, this hyprocite, and is not denounced from the pulpit. That speaks volumes for the pefidy of the church also. If the scarring of his face had occurred after all of this betrayal I would have called it justice. Now? We can only hope for a painful slow death for this despicable person when he has a lot of time to contemplate his treasonous poisonous acts against Yulia and Ukraine and Ukrainian youth.

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Anonymous Nov. 15, 2011, 10:31 p.m.    

The article stated 1.5% not 15%.

... Of course, that's within a 3% range of error....

So perhaps he could NEGATIVE support; being within the statistic error range.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 5:23 a.m.    

Recent public opinion polls record Yushchenko's support at 1.5% He received just over 5% of the vote in the first round of voting in 2010. History will record him as a failed president.

He should to have dismissed the previous parliament. His actions were unconstitutional. If he wanted to remove Yanukovych as President all he had to do was support the formation of an Orange governing coalition

,,,

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:50 p.m.    

Correction: He should NOT have dismissed the previous parliament. His actions were unconstitutional and illegal. In doing so he undermined confidence in the political process. If he wanted to remove Yanukovych as prime-minster all he had to do was support the formation of an Orange governing coalition

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Anonymous Nov. 15, 2011, 9:59 p.m.    

This woman was given her start by Yushchenko when he appointed her deputy PM.What was her role in his illness that destroyed his face.Yushchenko must have good reason to hate this woman,look how decent he is with other political opponents.

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Anonymous Nov. 15, 2011, 10:35 p.m.    

Tymoshenko saved Yuchenko's ass numerous times.

And I also think Yuchenko was paid off; with the hidden threat of being terminated, once &amp; for all.

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Anonymous Nov. 22, 2011, 8:19 a.m.    

They used each other to gain their own objectives Tym didn't have any choice but to support Yush in 2004 and she, alledgely, got a written promise in her pocket that she would become PM. Nobody did the other one any favours. It's stupid arguing who saved who.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:47 p.m.    

He was a botter failed dicttor. Tyshenki9 had the support of the people if it was not for her and Moroz Yushchenko would have remained a minotr player on the sideline. He lacked leadership, policies or understanding of what democracy is all about. He opposed representative government and democratic reforms. He single handedly set back Ukraine's democratic development decades if not generations. He has the lowest support rating and the highest disapproval at the end of his first term then any other head of state in the world

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 12:42 a.m.    

Mr. Kuzio, you forgot to make an important financial disclosure about your private business with BUT.

“Yushchenko was THE ONLY well-known public person in Ukraine who supported the sentence.” - what a load of BS.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 6:26 a.m.    

his real name is Yanukovych

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 2 a.m.    

STFU Bohdanchyck, you Party of the Pigs stooge! Yushchenko is dog shit on the pavement.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 9:50 a.m.    

Yushchenko had the courage to put the Moscali traitor Tymoshenko in prison where she belongs.

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 11:19 p.m.    

A Svidomite argument against other Svidomites.

Shades of OUN(B) and OUN(M).

Somewhat comical.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:41 p.m.    

I agree. Yushchenko was opposed to Ukraine becoming a democratic state. His dismissal of the previous parliament caused more economic hardship then the specious allegations of he has levelled against Tymoshenko that resulted in her being jailed. Tymoshenko should now speak out and disclose the truth behind Yushchenko's alleged poisoning. Expose him for the cad and liar he is.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 6:01 a.m.    

So who paid for your load of BS?

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 11:18 p.m.    

KP approved at that.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 4:55 a.m.    

QUOTE:

Yushchenko’s support for the sentence is a product of his personality as he showed himself to be a “very low moral person” who “betrayed tens of millions of people.” Omelchenko and other Orange politicians have pointed to Yushchenko continuing to live in the president’s dacha as a “reward” for his anti-Tymoshenko vendetta.&quot;

Yushchenko is a failed president who betrayed Ukraine and democracy itself. His policies and action undermined confidence in democracy. Ukraine could not have elected a worst person to be head of state. His support rating in 2004 was 52% and by 2010 it was less than 5%, (Currently below 1.5%) Yushchenko has set back Ukraine's democratic development decades if not generations.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 2:33 p.m.    

Yush has left the Dasha - which Kuzio knows perfectly well. Kuzio strings together a lot of quotes of people criticising Yush. So a lot of people don't like him. So? I don't suppose he writes such rubbish in his academic papers but he obviously thinks that newspaper readers have no brains and accept any illogical, simplistic and one-sided junk.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:59 p.m.    

Kuzio speaks the truth. and should be congratulated for speaking out and exposing the hypocrisy behind Yushchenko. Yushchenko espoused teh words of democracy and rule of law but his policies and actions were anything but democratic or constitutional.

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 11:17 p.m.    

Kuzio is a KP promoted hack.

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 11:16 p.m.    

Such is the sorry state of journalism and the hacks with paper credentials, who flop when it comes to exhibiting a superior intellect.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 5:29 a.m.    

If anyone should be facing charges of misuse and abuse of public office it is Yushchenko. His illegal and unconstitutional dismissal of Ukraine's previous parliament and his interference in the independence and operation of Ukraine' Constitutional Court set the pace for the events that have unfolded since. Tymohsenko's biggest mistake was trusting Yushchenko and not supporting his impeachment when she had a chance.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 9:52 a.m.    

i'm not agree with you 100%. it's not true. Yushchenko was the best president we ever had. you should live in Ukraine to know better about Ukraine and our politic situation.don't write what you don't know for sure.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:56 p.m.    

Yushchenko was the worst president in Ukraine's history. His disaproval rating was over 85% the highest for any first term head of state in the world. He lacked leadership and moral values. He betrayed the revolution and all those who had supported his election. Tysmoshenko's biggest mistake was trusting him for as long as she did. She should have supported his impeachment and pushed ahead with democratic reforms removing power from the office of the president.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 3:03 p.m.    

There was no path to NATO. And the EU doesn't want Ukraine as a member. As for the agents of Orange there was no discernible economic benefit from their short lived rule. And when the electricity is going or the food has gone that is all that counts. Yanuk hopes the Russians may supply the money that keeps the IMF at bay. And they may, at a price.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 5:25 p.m.    

Ah! My mistake at putting the decimel point in the wrong place. Thanks for pointing it out. 1.5 % is a lot better than 15% for sure.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 6:13 p.m.    

Yushenko is done! Finished! He betrayed us and we will never forgive him.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 6:19 p.m.    

There's a world of difference between supporting Yulia's trial which Yush obviously does and being an important factor in it happening, which he is not. I don't think Kuzio would argue that Yanuk and POR are in charge and that whatever they decided would be done, whatever Yush said or thought. Yanuk did not need Yush's approval to proceed. Indeed, Yanuk tried to persuade the EU that Yush was the insitagator and that ploy didn't work with anyone, except, it now appears, Kuzio.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:34 p.m.    

Yushchenko initiated the alleged charges that she was jailed under. If anyone should be facing jail and prosecution for misuse and abuse of public office it is Yushchenko

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 6:32 p.m.    

If Yush's support in the public stands at 1.5% and his disapproval rating is above 80%, (as is nausiatingly repeated by a commentator at every possible opportunity) it doesn't sound like he has much influence with the public. It therefore seems much more reasonable to conclude that the fact the only 3,000 people came out to support Tym, is because as Femen pointed out &quot;Yu and Ya&quot; the same shit.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 8:06 p.m.    

The comment has been made that people underestimate Yanu at their peril. I agree. To say that he is not book-learned is only one way of measuring intelligence. Yanu has street smarts because he grew up in the streets and a life of crime. To succeed in crime requires a certain kind of intelligence - look at the Mafia - some are ingenious in circumventing the law. The way Yanu moved - quickly - to shore up his powers shows a devious conniving but thinking mind. So I would agree - underestimate this man at your peril as he has absolutely no morals, no ethics, and no scruples. He will lie and cheat with a straight face and if Ukrainians are so taken in with a few more crumbs on their plates that they tolerate this then they should remember that Yulia and Lutsenko and others are only the beginning. Yanu will shoot to kill at all public demonstrations if he is desperate enough. Are Ukrainians as determined as the opposition in Syria for instance that they are willing to shed their blood&amp;#201; There was a time in the past when they would but I do not think they would today.

And one more thing. Kuzio mentions the low number of demonstrators who turn up to support Yulia. Ukrainans should definitely show up and support her publicly as it is important. Not do do so because they are not fond of her or think she has a shady past is a mistake. They are not so much supporting Yulia as they are her right to a fair trial and human rights. This is something for ALL Ukrainians, and not just Yulia. She is only the flavor of the month, so to speak, but if Ukrainians think they are immune to the same kind of treatment - well I have news for them.

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 2:23 a.m.    

I will add this.....

Yanuks actions are crime.......

But the bigger crime......is the people's apathy to do NOTHING !!1

Respectfully......

.

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 4:57 p.m.    

Let me make clear that I am no Yanukovych supporter. But to arbitrarily throw Yanuk in the same category as the dictators in the Middle East like Assad or Mubarak or Gadhafi, who all ruled their countries for decades and were never legitimately elected, a person has to be either a liar or a moron, or maybe both.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 11:01 a.m.    

All are governed by a presidential system. All are equally flawed in design and execution.

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 8:24 p.m.    

Cable 09KYIV2133

... Alier warned that Ukraine's partners should take Tymoshenko's assurances &quot;with a big grain of salt&quot;.

8. (C) The Prime Minister was &quot;willing to promise anything

to anybody&quot; to make budget, gas, and domestic debt payments...

Cable 10KYIV278

... Tymoshenko: Power-hungry populist.

C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 KYIV 000190

... the Russians have enough leverage over Tymoshenko to keep her in line, he said. The big business interests who back Yanukovych will force him to protect Ukraine's interests.

Cable 07BAKU1227

...Azerbaijan has finalized its energy plan, Aliyev said. Azerbaijan supported the Krakow Summit and the proposed Odessa-Brody-Plotsk oil pipeline “even though the project is seen as anti-Russian” because Ukraine, Poland and Georgia are friendly to Azerbaijan.

http://gazeta.ua/index.php?id=240651

... доручення за підписом прем`єр-міністра Юлії Тимошенко, в якому вона заборонила представникам урядових структур і державних компаній брати участь у переговорах, нарадах і консультаціях і підписувати документи з транспортування нафти трубопроводом «Одеса-Броди»

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Anonymous Nov. 16, 2011, 10:34 p.m.    

Such a long article decrying Yush. Seems like Kuzio is flogging a dead horse again and again. At the moment (and in my opinion unfortunately) he's irrelevant in Ukrainian politics and it doesn't look like it will change. Hasn't Kuzio got anything more important to write about that's more current?

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 9:04 p.m.    

Doesn't the Kyiv Post have anything better to re-post from another venue?

The Kyiv Post has the gall to belittle Russia Today.

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 2:19 a.m.    

To use your line of reasoning.....

It is more important the people expose the current crook who is masquerading as President.....

Yanuk has single handedly destroyed democracy in Ukraine.

He has betrayed and is betraying the people of Ukraine every day.

*************

A president is someone who cares more about the welfare of a nations people and the nation .

Is this Yanuk???

If not......get rid of him.

.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 11 a.m.    

No. The problem is with the office of the president. Power should not be concentrated in the hands of one individual. Ukraine needs to take collective responsibility for its own government, I support representative parliamentary democracy. A president at best can only represent 50% + 1 A parliament represent the people. These is not one Presidential system in in the world that works. Not one be it RUssia or the USA system. I would prefer to have a monarchy to a presidential system.

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Anonymous Nov. 22, 2011, 10:42 a.m.    

yes Yushchenko is irrelevant to Ukraine he was irrelevant also when he was President and even more so now. Hopefully he will continue to be irrelevant. The best thing Yushchenko can do is to move to the USA and live out the rest his pathetic life in exil knowing that history will not record reflect positively on his term of office.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 11:30 p.m.    

It is important that Yushchenko be exposed for his actions. Kuzio is correct in his comments and criticism. Yushchenko has single handley destroyed faith, trust and hope in the political process and democracy itself. Be has betrayed all who had supported him. His presidency will be remembered in a footnote as the worst president in Ukraine';s history. A president that betrayed a revolution.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 9:06 p.m.    

Kuzio is an overrated propaganda hack.

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Anonymous Nov. 20, 2011, 10:01 a.m.    

Yes - its makes you despair that no one seems to notice the many and obvious flaws in his arguments. Whatever one's position, there should be a minimum requirement to produce a coherent aritcle as any first year student at any university is taught. For instance, the facts should support the author's contention. Here Kuzio writes an article claiming Yush's influence has been underestimated and yet the only evidence he produces is that Yush supported Yulia's trial. We all knew that. That doesn't prove Kuzio's conention which was the justifcation for writing the article one iota - to do that Kuzio would have had to produce some kind of evident that Yush had influence over the process, which Kuzio does not.

Secondly Kuzio writes in a heap of disorded paragraphs which have no connection with each other. Here is an example:

&quot;Finally, Ukraine fatigue led most countries to initially welcome Yanukovych’s victory because they believed it would end “Orange” chaos and bring “stability.” Yanukovych was therefore given a long honeymoon period for most of 2010 during which criticism of democratic regression was mooted and phrased diplomatically.

Political repression of dozens of opponents only led to negative consequences in EU-Ukraine relations after August 5, 2011, when Tymoshenko was imprisoned for contempt of court.

Yushchenko’s support for Tymo­shenko’s sentence reveals political immaturity, a lack of dignity and willingness to prioritize personal revenge over Ukraine’s national interests. In 2006 and 2011, respectively, he has supported policies that have undermined Ukraine’s path to NATO and the EU.&quot;

Where's the line of argument? How does any editor let this kind of disorganaized writing get puslished? Three totally disconnected paragraphs one after the other.

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 11:13 p.m.    

The KP has become really low grade as evidenced by its childish &quot;Editor's note&quot; about RT when posting articles from that venue.

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Anonymous Nov. 22, 2011, 10:44 a.m.    

It is important that Yushchenko's role in Tymoshenko's persecution be placed on the public record. we thank Dr Kuzio for his due diligence in setting the historic record straight.

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Anonymous Nov. 17, 2011, 1:13 p.m.    

И видел я Ангела сильного, провозглашающего громким голосом: кто достоин раскрыть сию книгу и снять печати ее?

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 1:27 a.m.    

Former Kyiv Mayor Oleksandr Omelchenko, elected to parliament in the pro-Yushchenko Our Ukraine-Peoples Self Defense, believes that Yushchenko’s support for the sentence is a product of his personality as he showed himself to be a “very low moral person” who “betrayed tens of millions of people.”

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 1:41 a.m.    

The real issue is with the Office of the president not just the office holder. As recommended by PACE and the Venice Commission Ukraine needs to remove power and authority from the President and adopt a full Parliamentary system of government.

As long as Ukraine remains beholden to Presidential &quot;rule by decree&quot; it will never be a free independent democratic state.

Ukraine needs to take collective responsibility for its own governance, A full parliamentary model is the best form of democratic representative government.

The presidential system is the root cause of Ukraine's ongoing political problems and division. It costs 100's of Millions of dollars to run a Presidential campaign and only the rich and famous can afford to run. Money that would be better spent esle where.

Yushchenko opposed Ukraine becoming a democratic state. Ukraine should have followed in the footsteps of other European states, such as Estonia and Latvia, which had adopted European models of government.

Yushchenko espoused the words of democracy and European integration yet his actions and policies were anti democratic and anti European. Clearly had no vision or understanding of true democratic values.

Taras Kuzio is correct in highlighting the many flaws of Yushchenko's presidency but his greatest failure was his opposition to democratic Constitutional reform and his betrayal of the Ukrainian people.

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 2:42 a.m.    

This &quot;Guest&quot; has been stating the same BS on hundreds of KP articles.

Other countries with a parliamentary system have patriots in Parliament.

UKRAINE has Anti-UKRAINIANS and mobsters in UKRAINE'S Parliament.

The KGB could buy UKRAINE'S Parliament and have Putin elected as the president of UKRAINE,

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 9:37 a.m.    

It is not on.y guest that has recommended that Ukraine adopt a full parliamentary model. PACE and the Venice Commission has also recommended it as have most of Ukraine's parliamentarians. Yanukovych also supported it until he became President. It is clear to all that the presidential system has failed Ukraine and Yushchenko the least supported. the proposal to remove power from the president is a good one and should be supported. It was the most significant gain during the orange revolution and have now been removed.

The Baltic States are all former Soviet states that are now successful European parliamentary democracies, why not Ukraine?

.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 9:01 p.m.    

Fool,

Polls in Ukraine show that Putin is more popular than Yushchenko, Tymoshenko and Yanukovych.

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 4:42 p.m.    

The boos and whistles that greeted the Russian prime minister when he stepped into the ring and took the microphone at a martial arts event in Moscow on Sunday may have given him a shock.

Read more:

http://www.kyivpost.com/news/russia/detail/117329/#ixzz1eLorvSqA

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Anonymous Nov. 21, 2011, 11:10 p.m.    

Michelle Obama got boos at a NASCAR event.

So what!

Russia is free.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 10:41 a.m.    

25 our of 27 EU member states are governed by a Parliamentary system. Ukraine, unlike Estonia and Latvia, retained the soviet presidential system where power is concentrated in teh hands of the President. The comments above rightly highlights concerns expressed by the Parliamentary Assemble of the Council of Europe (PACE) and the Venice Commission both of which have advocated Ukraine adopt a full parliamentary model.

The presidential system is the problem, it has failed Ukraine most notably under Yushchenko. Yushchenko persistently sought to undermine successive governments and in the process destabilise Ukraine. As a result of his actions he has destroyed public confidence in the political process and the rule of law.

Yes the parliament needs reform but it needs to first remove power from the office of the president.

Ukraine has struggled since independence to become a Parliamentary democracy. Yushchenko has consistently opposed this move

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Anonymous Nov. 22, 2011, 10:39 a.m.    

It is pretty obvious LES that you do not support democratic representative government and that you prefer a presidential dictatorship that is to your choosing.

Excaotly what is Your concept of &quot;what is Ukrainian&quot; Is it determined by citizenship or genetics or is it just something you espouse that only you can determine? As for me I prefer democratic representative government. A government that represents all of Ukraine not just what you perceive to be Ukrainian. A parliament is by far more representative then a president. A state without a parliament is a dictatorship. A state without a president is still capable of governing in the interests of the people. Democracy is preferable to autocracy. Safety in numbers. How is it that all the worlds despot countries are governed by a presidential system? Name one successful democratic state this a presidential system and I will name 10 successful democracies

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 6:13 p.m.    

We get it. Kuzio really, really hates Yushchenko. We get it!

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 10:48 a.m.    

Over 90% of Ukraine have the same point of view. Yushchenko hold the world record on the least supported head of state at the end of his first term. A record not to be proud of. He is a disgrace and all atttempts to white wash his name will not change the fact that history will not look favourably on his presidency. he betrayed a nation and all those who had supported him.

You can fool all of the people a some of the time,

most of the people some of the people most of the time.

but you can not fool all of the people all of the time.

90% of Urainians are not wrong on their opposition to Yushchenko.

Kuzio is just stating the obvious fact by telling the truth

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 8:59 p.m.    

Kuzio is being overly selective in an inaccurate way.

Most Ukrainians in Ukraine don't appear to be so against Tymoshenko's current predicament.

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Anonymous Nov. 18, 2011, 10:24 p.m.    

Yes - he's made it really clear. As clear as the &quot;Guest&quot; and his repeated Ukraine should be a Parliamentary Democracy and Yush is a failed President.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 10:55 a.m.    

It is obvisous to every one but you and the the 1.5% that still think Yushchenko was a good President. He achieved nothing. Ukraine is worst off today then it was in 2004.

Yushchenko created the environment which has allowed Yanukovych to seize power and reverse the positive changes that had been put in place.

Moroz would have made a better President then Yushchenko. Tymoshenko backed the wrong person to become president.

The only reason Yanukovych was elected Prime=-minister was because Yushchenko and Our Ukraine refused to share power and support the formation of an Orange governing coalition following the 2006 Parliamentary election. Yushchenko also backed Yanukovych in his bid to become President. he also was responsible for the jailing and persecution of Tymoshenko in November.

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Anonymous Nov. 19, 2011, 8:57 p.m.    

Kuzio might not get that most Ukrainians in Ukraine aren't so aghast at Tymoshenko's current situation.

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Anonymous Nov. 20, 2011, 10:02 a.m.    

Yushchenko is a worm! Who/what else would turn on the one most responsible for him making it to the Presidency?

When Tymoshenco did not fully support his personal vendetta against Russia over unproven allegations that somebody connected to that country was responsible for poisoning him, he went after her.

Ergo the worm turned and elevated her to number one public (read Yushchenko) enemy and then carried out a vendetta.

As for the 2009 gas agreement, the wiley Putin did take advantage of her weak position, a weakness largely stemming from Yushchenko's vendettas which now are his principal legacy.

The present government ought to get rid of a conviction in a case that does not have merit; if incompetence was a crime jails worldwide would be full of (ex)politicians and most certainly Yushchenko would have a place therein. It is not too late for Yanokovich to make it right by ending, not continuing the worm's dirty little vendetta.

Then the government might get back to looking for $405Million that Russia is claiming and Tymoshenko, guilty or not, needs to account for. That MAY well justify legitimate criminal actions.

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Anonymous Nov. 23, 2011, 1:01 a.m.    

Wiley Putin took advantage of Tymoshenko? LOL

Yushechenko had a vendetta against Tymoshenko because of the poisioning (even though she was not involved and she had no power to force Russia to do anything)? LOL

Tymoshenko's weakness with Putin is Yushchenko's fault ???

ROFLMAO!!!!

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