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You're reading: National betrayal

Anyone who has spent time in Ukraine knows that the Russian language remains dominant over Ukrainian. Russian is not a minority language. Russian does not require special protection by law.

In fact, the Ukrainian language – suppressed for centuries – could use a boost, along with a healthy dose of national identity and pride. Moreover, picking a fight over language – as politicians have done this week – is not what Ukrainians want. People remained most concerned about the economy, introducing rule of law to their nation and becoming a full-fledged member of the European family of nations. The people want their leaders to combat corruption, bureaucracy, cronyism and nepotism – not be the instigators of these pervasive problems. 

Ukrainians and visitors alike also know that, despite historical and cultural differences that exist across this great land, it is home to 45 million people who are peaceful, seeking positive changes and far too patient with their unresponsive political representatives.

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