The Kyiv Post welcomes feedback about our new website and we stand ready to fix any problems users might encounter in our test phase. Contact us at: news@kyivpost.com or +38-044-591-3344. Thank you!

Further fuelling suspicions regarding coordination between hired thugs and the police, Korrespondent.net reports that at the same time that the titushki began their rampage, Berkut riot police tried to storm the barricades on Hrushewsky St hurling stones and stun grenades.  They were apparently deflected, but it seems at least likely that the trail of smashed cars, etc, might later have been presented as the reason for the offensive. 

At around 3 a.m. on Tuesday morning, EuroMaidan SOS put out a message asking people to photograph or video how the thugs were smashing cars and attacking people.  The brazen nature of their behaviou gave grounds for fearing attempts by the police to pin these actions on EuroMaidan protesters. 

This will not be the first time.  

The situation is considerable more tense and violent than at the beginning of December, however there are obvious analogies with the disturbances on Bankova St on Dec 1.  On that occasion, the disturbances began in the only areas of the centre where there were police or Interior Ministry forces cordons.  Despite many hundreds of thousands of protesters and almost no police to be seen, the main part of the demonstration that day passed off without any trouble.

The events outside the president’s administration were caught on video and clearly showed the involvement of Dmytro Korchynski who, together with his marginal Bratstvo movement, is known for provocations aimed at causing police crackdowns.  He was not, however, declared on the wanted list until after he had had time to go into hiding or abroad. 

Instead those detained included 9 men almost all of whom were badly beaten by Berkut riot police and who bore no resemblance to the masked thugs on all video footage. 

The net was then widened to include a Road Control journalist Andry Dzyndzya and then his lawyer, Viktor Smaly and an AutoMaidan activist Volodymyr Kadura.

The latter three, and one of the original detainees, Yaroslav Prytulenko, remain in custody.  (see: The President’s Bankova Prisoners)

The original trouble on Sunday, Jan 19 on Hrushevsky St was probably also deliberately orchestrated. 

There appear to be grounds for believing that at least some of the 31 people already detained are EuroMaidan activists taking no part in disturbances.

There is every reason to be careful  – and to try, without attracting attention, to photograph everything.

Halya Coynash is a member of the Kharkiv Human Rights Protection Group.

Found a spelling error? Let us know – highlight it and press Ctrl + Enter.

Advertisement

Add comment

Sorry, you must be logged in to post a comment.
Attention

Add a picture
Choose file
Add a quote
Attention

Are you sure you want to delete your comment?

Attention

Are you sure you want to delete all user's comments?

Attention

Are you sure you want to unapprove user's comment?

Attention

Are you sure you want to move to spam user's comment?

Attention

Are you sure you want to move to trash user's comment?

Spelling error report

The following text will be sent to our editors: