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You're reading: Ukraine’s young and poor are left to survive on their own

The phenomenon first received media attention in 2004. Why so late? Well, its center is a ghost-like class of people. It’s neither the proletariat nor the middle class; it’s somewhere in between.

Karl Marx, the ideologist of Communism, once wrote about the “absolute impoverishment of the proletariat.” For the precariat, on the other hand, relative poverty is an attribute. Its representatives are not dying from hunger, but they live in worse conditions than those who hold a permanent job. They themselves do not have one, and are unlikely to obtain one. In a lifetime, they generally go through 30 employers.

The term “precariat” comes from the Latin “precarious,” which has two meanings, both of which are fit to describe this group. The first describes the state of begging, obtaining something based on mercy. And the second suggests a state that is temporary, unreliable and transitioning.

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