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RIA Novosti: Language debate splits Ukraine

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July 7, 2012, 10:17 a.m. | Ukraine abroad — by RIA Novosti

An opposition protester holds an umbrella with the colors of the Ukrainian flag as he protects himself against hot weather in front of the parliament in Kiev on July 6, 2012, during a permanent rally against a controversial bill elevating the status of Russian. The parliament adjourned on July 6 for a summer recess despite failing to resolve a crisis over its rushed passing of the bill. In its final session, the Verkhovna Rada voted not to even consider whether to accept the resignation of speaker Volodymyr Lytvyn who announced he would quit after not being warned the chamber was preparing to pass the bill. The Rada is not due to convene again until September 4 and the recess essentially leaves Ukrainian politics in limbo as the speaker's signature is required for the bill -- adopted on July 4 -- to be considered approved. AFP PHOTO/ SERGEI SUPINSKY
© AFP

In Ukraine, squeezed between Russia and the states of the Eastern Europe, the unfolding drama over the new language bill elevating the status of Russian has reignited age-old debates over culture, history, and even independence and identity.

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kpxoxol July 7, 2012, 7:04 p.m.    

The orange losers who make funny noises on the streets are PITIFUL AND INSIGNIFICANT MINORITY, heh, heh, heh :D

"Director of the Kyiv-based Center for Political and Conflict Studies Mykhailo Pohrebynsky said at a press conference on Friday that about 20% of Ukrainians support the position of "ousting the Russian language from official use" in Ukraine.

"All that the opposition is currently doing is defending the position of a minority of Ukrainian citizens, while a majority calls for raising the status of the Russian language. All this hysteria, hunger strikes and so forth are the result of this, and I think this is an example of totalitarian thinking," the analyst said."

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Roman Dawydiak July 25, 2012, 2:42 p.m.    

As a representative of the little russian population, Ivan Durak also supports the views held by Pohrebynsky.

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